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My question is whether it is possible through general methods to determine in any high-level language whether an item in a vector-type variable (a list, a string, an array, etc. anything that can be subscripted) is another vector-type variable or a scalar type?
Here's an example of what I'm trying to do: (since I am using LISP-like functions I will present it as though it were in Scheme, even though I'm actually using Python for this project currently)

( define S
  ( lambda
    ( x )
    ( cons
      ( car x )
      ( cons
        ( caddr x )
        ( cons
          ( cons
            ( cadr x )
            ( cons
              ( caddr x )
              ()
            )
          )
          ( cdddr x )
        )
      )
    )
  )
)

( define K
  ( lambda
    ( x )
    ( cons
      ( car x )
      ( cddr x )
    )
  )
)

Now I have a function which goes through and performs the logic so that the lazy evaluation can be done in whatever language you're using, rather than performing the computations on the nested levels first. It works fine if you're merely using a single layer such as SKK like this:

>>> ski(['s', 'k', 'k', 1, 2, 3])
[1, 2, 3]

However, if you try to do another layer like S(KS)K it will perform the first operation, but once it gets to the nested list, I have hit a wall in the logic to make it continue further:

>>> ski(['s', ['k', 's'], 'k', 1, 2, 3])
[['k', 's'], 1, ['k', 1], 2, 3]

Now what I'd like to do here is test to see if the first item is another list rather than simply a scalar type like 's' or 1. I have thought of an idea for how to do it using the length of the first item, but since scalars are unsubscriptable, it returns an error. Now I could probably do this using an error-handling construct, but I don't want to use an error-handling construct as part of the primary logic for my function if I can at all help it, especially if it's something that will be used repeatedly and likely yield an error most of the time.

Ideally, I'd like to try to find a way to do this that would not be specific to any one language and which doesn't rely on any one language's built-in library of functions to determine type and whatever, if possible, since my goal is to try to port this project to as many languages as possible.

Of course, once I have determined that the variable is indeed a list, I am going to uncons it so that I can continue processing it one piece at a time in a recursive function that goes through the whole list and lazily evaluates it.

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