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I store a few classes in session. I want to be able to see the values of my class properties in trace viewer. By default I only the Type name MyNamespace.MyClass. I was wondering if I overwrite the .ToString() method and use reflection to loop over all the properties and construct a string like that ... it would do the trick but just wanted to see if there is anything already out there (specially since Immediate Window has this capability) which does the same ... i.e. list the class property values in trace instead of just the Name of the class.

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3 Answers 3

I believe this would be helpful: C# object dumper

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Thanks! Do you know if it would also work for static classes? –  Robert Dec 21 '10 at 22:31
    
No, you cannot create an object of a static class. –  Shuo Dec 21 '10 at 22:44
    
If you want to print the static properties, then it would be very easy to do it based on the code given –  Shuo Dec 21 '10 at 22:48
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You can try something like that:

static void Dump(object o, TextWriter output)
{
    if (o == null)
    {
        output.WriteLine("null");
        return;
    }

    var properties =
        from prop in o.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
        where prop.CanRead
        && !prop.GetIndexParameters().Any() // exclude indexed properties to keep things simple
        select new
        {
            prop.Name,
            Value = prop.GetValue(o, null)
        };

    output.WriteLine(o.ToString());
    foreach (var prop in properties)
    {
        output.WriteLine(
            "\t{0}: {1}",
            prop.Name,
            (prop.Value ?? "null").ToString());
    }
}

Of course, it's not very efficient because of the reflection... A better solution would be to dynamically generate and cache a dumper method for each specific type.


EDIT: here's an improved solution, that uses Linq expressions to generate a specialized dumper method for each type. Slightly more complex ;)

static class Dumper
{
    private readonly static Dictionary<Type, Action<object, TextWriter>> _dumpActions
        = new Dictionary<Type, Action<object, TextWriter>>();

    private static Action<object, TextWriter> CreateDumper(Type type)
    {
        MethodInfo writeLine1Obj = typeof(TextWriter).GetMethod("WriteLine", new[] { typeof(object) });
        MethodInfo writeLine1String2Obj = typeof(TextWriter).GetMethod("WriteLine", new[] { typeof(string), typeof(object), typeof(object) });

        ParameterExpression objParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(object), "o");
        ParameterExpression outputParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TextWriter), "output");
        ParameterExpression objVariable = Expression.Variable(type, "o2");
        LabelTarget returnTarget = Expression.Label();
        List<Expression> bodyExpressions = new List<Expression>();

        bodyExpressions.Add(
            // o2 = (<type>)o
            Expression.Assign(objVariable, Expression.Convert(objParam, type)));

        bodyExpressions.Add(
            // output.WriteLine(o)
            Expression.Call(outputParam, writeLine1Obj, objParam));

        var properties =
            from prop in type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
            where prop.CanRead
            && !prop.GetIndexParameters().Any() // exclude indexed properties to keep things simple
            select prop;

        foreach (var prop in properties)
        {
            bool isNullable =
                !prop.PropertyType.IsValueType ||
                prop.PropertyType.IsGenericType && prop.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);

            // (object)o2.<property> (cast to object to be passed to WriteLine)
            Expression propValue =
                 Expression.Convert(
                     Expression.Property(objVariable, prop),
                     typeof(object));

            if (isNullable)
            {
                // (<propertyValue> ?? "null")
                propValue =
                    Expression.Coalesce(
                        propValue,
                        Expression.Constant("null", typeof(object)));
            }

            bodyExpressions.Add(
                // output.WriteLine("\t{0}: {1}", "<propertyName>", <propertyValue>)
                Expression.Call(
                    outputParam,
                    writeLine1String2Obj,
                    Expression.Constant("\t{0}: {1}", typeof(string)),
                    Expression.Constant(prop.Name, typeof(string)),
                    propValue));
        }

        bodyExpressions.Add(Expression.Label(returnTarget));

        Expression<Action<object, TextWriter>> dumperExpr =
            Expression.Lambda<Action<object, TextWriter>>(
                Expression.Block(new[] { objVariable }, bodyExpressions),
                objParam,
                outputParam);

        return dumperExpr.Compile();
    }

    public static void Dump(object o, TextWriter output)
    {
        if (o == null)
        {
            output.WriteLine("null");
        }

        Type type = o.GetType();
        Action<object, TextWriter> dumpAction;
        if (!_dumpActions.TryGetValue(type, out dumpAction))
        {
            dumpAction = CreateDumper(type);
            _dumpActions[type] = dumpAction;
        }
        dumpAction(o, output);
    }
}

Usage:

Dumper.Dump(myObject, Console.Out);
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Thomas, thanks, this looks like a neat solution but I am still using .NET 3.5 so things like TragetLabel, Expression.Block() etc won't allow me to compile. –  Robert Dec 22 '10 at 16:46
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This is the code I use. I find it incredibly useful and is almost instant. The code is using the Newtonsoft JSON converter.

    [System.Obsolete("ObjectDump should not be included in production code.")]
    public static void Dump(this object value)
    {
        try
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(value, Formatting.Indented));
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine("Object could not be formatted. Does it include any interfaces? Exception Message: " + exception.Message);
        }
    }

Add this to a common library, reference it and add it to the using clause. Can be used in the immediate window by typing YourObject.Dump() (the exact same as you'd do in linqpad).

Classes including interfaces have to be handled differently as this is simply a JSON converter. A workaround for classes that include interface implementations that I use is to remove the default empty constructor and implement a constructor using the specific instances of the interfaces.

I find JSON a very easy format to read and consider this small method invaluable for debugging.

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