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Whenever we use an aggregate function in SQL (MIN, MAX, AVG etc), we must always GROUP BY all non-aggregated columns, for instance:

SELECT storeid, storename, SUM(revenue), COUNT(*)
FROM Sales 
GROUP BY storeid, storename

It becomes even more intrusive when we use a function or other calculation in our SELECT statement, as this must also be copied to the GROUP BY clause.

SELECT (2 * (x + y)) / z + 1, MyFunction(x, y), SUM(z)
FROM AnotherTable
GROUP BY (2 * (x + y)) / z + 1, MyFunction(x, y)

If we ever change the SELECT statement, we must remember to make the same change to our GROUP BY clause.

So is the GROUP BY clause is redundant?

  • If this is indeed the case, then why is there a GROUP BY clause in SQL at all?
  • If this is not the case, then what extra functionality does GROUP BY give us?
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programmers.se would be a better place to ask how the leopard got its spots. –  bmargulies Dec 22 '10 at 1:18
2  
Pick a database, or this borders on subjective because what is ANSI and what is implemented are different things. Implementation of ANSI lags behind existing functionality, and that functionality is not guaranteed between vendors. Case in point: Mark Byers is using MySQL as justification when only SQLite shares the functionality -- DB2, Oracle, SQL Server, and PostgreSQL do not. –  OMG Ponies Dec 22 '10 at 2:02
    
At the Naval Academy (harrumph!) years ago the Secretary of the Navy came down to give a speech, and afterwards took questions. A young middie stood up and asked a long, involved, and detailed question regarding the topic addressed by SECNAV, who replied, "Well, young man, it's clear you know much more about this than I do. Could you write up a 5000 word point paper on this subject, and have it on my desk tomorrow morning? Thanks". I'm told the room broke into raucous laughter. My point - please implement a relational database, then comment on the usefulness of GROUP BY. Thanks. –  Bob Jarvis Dec 22 '10 at 2:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Whenever we use an aggregate function in SQL (MIN, MAX, AVG etc), we must always GROUP BY all non-aggregated columns

This is not true in general. MySQL for example doesn't require this, and the SQL standard doesn't say this either.

It becomes even more intrusive when we use a function or other calculation in our SELECT statement, as this must also be copied to the GROUP BY clause.

Also not true in general. MySQL (and perhaps other databases too) allow column aliases to be used in the GROUP BY clause:

SELECT (2 * (x + y)) / z + 1 AS a, MyFunction(x, y) AS b, SUM(z)
FROM AnotherTable
GROUP BY a, b

If this is not the case, then what extra functionality does GROUP BY give us?

The only way of specifying what to group by is to use a GROUP BY clause. You cannot necessarily deduce it from the columns mentioned in the SELECT. In fact you don't even have to select all the columns mentioned in the GROUP BY:

SELECT MAX(col2)
FROM foo
GROUP BY col1
HAVING COUNT(*) = 2
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"This is not true in general... and the SQL standard doesn't say this either." From your link, the standard says: "If T is a grouped table, then each <column reference> in each <value expression> that references a column of T shall reference a grouping column or be specified within a <set function specification>." The author interprets this as: "Queries that include a GROUP BY clause can only include column references in SELECT-ed expressions if the column appears in the GROUP BY clause, or if that column appears as part of an aggregate." This seems to agree with what I originally said. –  Mike Chamberlain Dec 22 '10 at 1:51
    
However, your last example does show extra functionality provided GROUP BY, so +1. –  Mike Chamberlain Dec 22 '10 at 1:53
2  
The standard is nice, and all, but Oracle, SQL Server and PostgreSQL require all non-aggregated columns to be defined in the GROUP BY -- SQLite is the only other DB I'm aware of that shares MySQL's lack GROUP BY. The MySQL documentation also states that the values for non-aggregated columns that aren't in the GROUP BY are arbitrary, the value can not be guaranteed consistent. –  OMG Ponies Dec 22 '10 at 1:54
1  
@Mikey Cee: I thought SQL Server did, but testing on 2005 comfirms -- can't use a column alias in the GROUP BY or HAVING clauses. –  OMG Ponies Dec 22 '10 at 2:14
1  
You're right Mark - I had to read it a couple more times to understand, but now I see that the new standard stipulates that the non-aggregated columns in the SELECT need only be functionally dependent on the GROUP BY, though even if they are not, the query is still legal, though inconsistent results may be returned. It seems that MySQL is the only DB that doesn't try to save you from yourself, allowing you to issue queries with an arbitrary GROUP BY, and therefore opening up the possibility of being returned meaningless data. –  Mike Chamberlain Dec 22 '10 at 3:51

I may agree with what you're saying, but it is not redundant in all cases.

Consider this:

SELECT FirstName 
       + ' (' + REPLACE(Address1, ',', ' ') + ' '
       + REPLACE(Address2, ',', ' ') + ', '
       + UPPER(State) + ' '
       + 'USA)',
       COUNT(*)
FROM Profiles
GROUP BY FirstName, Address1, Address2, State

In this case I just want the number of same-first-name, same-address profiles.
As you can see, I didn't have to repeat the "complex" operations of the SELECT in the GROUP BY statement.

I think to allow this "sometimes like this, sometimes like that", you are taxed with having to do repetitions most of the time.

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The GROUP BY clause is not redundant -- it's function is to define the scope that the aggregate functions work on. It's your belief that the optimizer should read from the SELECT clause to know what the scope of the grouping is, but access to column aliases are available in the ORDER BY clause at the earliest (with the exception of MySQL, where the GROUP BY and HAVING clauses support column aliases). There's no means to support your expectation, currently. ANSI standards are nice, but the reality is ANSI standards aren't implemented in their entirety by vendors. It's hunt & peck support, like how PostgreSQL 8.4+ supports more analytic functions than Oracle (certainly more than SQL Server).

MySQL and SQLite support omitting columns from the GROUP BY, but those column values are, per the documentation, arbitrary -- the value can not be guaranteed to be returned consistently. And the scope of the grouping is also different, which has the potential to drastically effect the resultset returned. Then there's the problem of relying on vendor specific syntax while needing to port to other databases because DB2, Oracle, SQL Server and PostgreSQL do not support the functionality.

But with the advent of analytic/windowing/ranking functionality, you can get aggregate functionality without the GROUP BY. IE:

SELECT t.id,
       COUNT(t.column) OVER(PARTITION BY t.id) AS num,
       SUM(t.column) OVER(PARTITION BY t.id) AS sum
  FROM YOUR_TABLE t

It's more verbose, and prone to error though because you can't define a PARTITION BY/ORDER BY that applies to all the analytic functions in a query. Currently... But Analytics won't supplant aggregates any time soon -- support started in Oracle 9i, SQL Server 2005+, and PostgreSQL 8.4+. I'm aware that DB2 supports analytics, but I don't know details beyond that.

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  1. The main here is (2 * (x + y)) / z + 1, MyFunction(x, y) after GROUP BY, be needed for the sum knows how to summary.
  2. But (2 * (x + y)) / z + 1, MyFunction(x, y) after SELECT are optionally. How you want the result will become, not affect to the sum()
    Just like BeemerGuy said, 2. isn't always same with 1.
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