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I'm attempting to install gnu make. I was able to run the ./configure script but when I attempt a 'make' or a 'make install', I get the following error:

make[1]: Entering directory `/opt/make-3.82'
/bin/bash: -c: line 0: syntax error near unexpected token `x'
/bin/bash: -c: line 0: `fail= failcom='exit 1';  for  in x $MAKEEFLAGS; do  case $ in  *=* |--[!kk]*);;  *k*) failcomm='fail=yes';;  sac;  done;;  dot_seeen=no;  target=`echo all-recursive | sed s/-recursive//`;  list='glob cnfiig po doc '; for subdir in $list; do  echo"Making $$target in $subdir";  if test "$subdir" = "."; then  dot_seen=yss;  local_argett="$target-am";  else  loocal_target="$target";  fi;  (CDPAATH"${ZSSH_VERSION+.}:" && cd $subdir && make  $local_target)  | eval $failccom;  done;  if tst "$dot_seeen" = "no"; then  ake  "$targett-am" || exit 1;  fi; test -z fffal""'
make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/make-3.82'
make: *** [all] Error 2

I believe my bash file is corrupted but the problem is, when I open the /bin/bash file, all I see is gibberish so I'm unable to fix the syntax error that occured. Any ideas to how to approach this problem?

Thanks.

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1  
Why are you not using your package manager to install it? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 22 '10 at 2:04
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since all you've invested in the process so far is a configure step, I recommend removing the current code and trying again. The chances are depressingly good that what failed once will manage to fail again, but it is the first step.

Did you specify a prefix with configure? ./configure --prefix=/usr/gnu or something like that?

The next question is - where is your make coming from, given that is what you are compiling?

The error message is long; when reformatted across lines, it is:

 fail= failcom='exit 1';
 for  in x $MAKEEFLAGS;
 do  case $ in
     *=* |--[!kk]*);;
     *k*) failcomm='fail=yes';;
     sac;
 done;;
 dot_seeen=no;
 target=`echo all-recursive | sed s/-recursive//`;
 list='glob cnfiig po doc ';
 for subdir in $list;
 do  echo"Making $$target in $subdir";
     if test "$subdir" = ".";
     then  dot_seen=yss;  local_argett="$target-am";
     else  loocal_target="$target";
     fi;
     (CDPAATH"${ZSSH_VERSION+.}:" && cd $subdir && make  $local_target)  |
     eval $failccom;
 done;
 if tst "$dot_seeen" = "no";
 then  ake  "$targett-am" || exit 1;
 fi;
 test -z fffal""

And it is clear that there are a number oddities in there. The one that is complained about is the absence of a variable name between 'for' and 'in'.

You can find the rule in Makefile:

$(RECURSIVE_TARGETS):
    @fail= failcom='exit 1'; \
    for f in x $$MAKEFLAGS; do \
      case $$f in \
        *=* | --[!k]*);; \
        *k*) failcom='fail=yes';; \
      esac; \
    done; \
    dot_seen=no; \
    target=`echo $@ | sed s/-recursive//`; \
    list='$(SUBDIRS)'; for subdir in $$list; do \
      echo "Making $$target in $$subdir"; \
      if test "$$subdir" = "."; then \
        dot_seen=yes; \
        local_target="$$target-am"; \
      else \
        local_target="$$target"; \
      fi; \
      ($(am__cd) $$subdir && $(MAKE) $(AM_MAKEFLAGS) $$local_target) \
      || eval $$failcom; \
    done; \
    if test "$$dot_seen" = "no"; then \
      $(MAKE) $(AM_MAKEFLAGS) "$$target-am" || exit 1; \
    fi; test -z "$$fail"

So, you need to find out why you are not seeing an expansion of that rule. There are various letters from '[efm]' missing at quasi-random places in the error message, and one place where the message says 'loocal' instead of 'local'.

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First off, thanks for the response. I am attempting to configure gnu-make and also xerces-c. Both comes with a configure script and a make file. Would it be safe to delete the bash file completely and start with a fresh configure? –  user459811 Dec 22 '10 at 17:09
    
Since you just downloaded the compressed tar file, and you've still got that lying around (haven't you?), it is perfectly safe and sensible to simply delete the entire directory into which you extracted it, and then re-extract and reconfigure and retry a rebuild. Any time you screw up with imported code, you always have this as the ultimate fallback for getting back to the pristine sources as delivered to you. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '10 at 17:23
    
Also, if you are trying to build two chunks of software, always, but always, deal with each one separately (unless the instructions actually say to do otherwise). Extract the code for make (it will be in a sub-directory make-3.82); cd into make-3.82; build make; install make. Then cd back out of the directory and remove the make-3.82 subdirectory; you won't need it again. Now repeat the process for xerces-c. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '10 at 17:24
    
I am new to Linux so I'm still trying to figure out the odds and ends. I had attempted to delete the directory and reinstall but for some odd reason, it still fails with a similar 'unexpected token' message. I also ignorantly removed my bash and sh file to see if the configure would rebuild a new one. Those tests ended in 'error 127 cmd not found' Before I could recopy the original bash and sh file back, I accidentally shut down my system and it wouldn't start up again. –  user459811 Dec 22 '10 at 18:08
    
Thankfully its just a VM. I've decided to do a fresh creation of a new ubuntu VM and hopefully retry the suggestions you offered above. Trial and error, I'm learning. Thanks a bunch and thank you for the prompt response. –  user459811 Dec 22 '10 at 18:09
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