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I see two ways it is done:

Method 1:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `sample` (  
  `sample_id` tinyint(2) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,  
  `description` varchar(32) NOT NULL,  
  `parent_id` int(10) NOT NULL,  
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,  
  PRIMARY KEY (`sample_id`)  
) ENGINE=InnoDB;  

ALTER TABLE sample ADD CONSTRAINT parent_id FOREIGN KEY (parent_id) REFERENCES parent_tbl(parent_id);  

Method 2:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `sample` (  
  `sample_id` tinyint(2) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,  
  `description` varchar(32) NOT NULL,  
  `parent_id` int(10) NOT NULL,  
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,  
  PRIMARY KEY (`sample_id`),  
  Foreign Key (parent_id) references parent_tbl(parent_id)  
) ENGINE=InnoDB;  

Which way is better or when to use one over the other?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first gives you more flexibility.

1) You are required to use the first method if you create the tables in an order such that a referenced table is created after its referencing table. If you have loops in your references then there may not be a way to avoid this. If there are no loops then there exists an order where all referenced tables are created before their referenced tables, but you may not want to spend time figuring out what that order is and rearranging your scripts.

2) It's not always the case that you know exactly what indexes you will need when you create the table. When you create indexes it is usually a good idea to measure the performance gain on some real data, and perhaps try multiple different indexes to see which works better. For this strategy to work you need to first create the table, insert some data and then you need to be able to modify the indexes for testing. Dropping and recreating the table is not as practical as ALTER TABLE in this situation.

Other than that there isn't really any difference and if you are starting from nothing there is no particular reason to favour one over the other. The resulting index is the same either way.

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sounds good, thanks. –  Juds Dec 22 '10 at 4:05

If you need to add a foreign key to an existing table, use method 1, if you are creating the schema from scratch use method 2.

There isn't a best way, they do the same thing.

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The end products are indistinguishable.

For clarity (it's nice to see the constraint explictly stand on it's own), I might advocate for the first.

For succinctness (saying the same thing in 1 statement vs 2), I'd might advocate for the second.

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