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Why is this invalid in C++?

class CLS
{
public:
    static int X;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    CLS::X=100;
    return 0;
}
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1  
What is c+_+? Do you often insert unde_rscores into w_ords for no reas_on? –  jalf Dec 22 '10 at 8:55

4 Answers 4

Once you define a static data member, it exists even though no objects of the static data member's class exist. In your example, no objects of class X exist even though the static data member CLS::X has been defined.

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Seems this doesn't answer my question... –  yoyo Dec 22 '10 at 5:44

static members aren't part of class object but they still are part of class scope. they must be initialized independently outside of class same as you would define a member function using the class scope resolution operator.

int CLS::X=100;
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They can be changed inside of main, like in your example, but you have to explicitely allocate storage for them in global scope, like here:

class CLS
{
public:
        static int X;
};

int CLS::X = 100; // alocating storage, usually done in CLS.cpp file.


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
        CLS::X=100;
        return 0;
}
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+1. This is the real issue. In the original example, you never actually allocated the storage for the static member. –  John R. Strohm Dec 22 '10 at 6:14

It isn't that the static member must be INITIALIZED at global scope, but rather that the static member must have storage allocated for it.

class CLS {
public:
  static int X;
};

int CLS::X;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
  CLS::X=100;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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