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What is the need of String array in the main method of JAVA, It is for use of command line argument programming & now a days programming with IDE like eclllipse, netbeans no need to pass any initial arguments.

If this signature of method is required for some purpose, why there is no any main method which is not taking any arguments and JVM invokes it to bootstrap Java program. (If one one dont want to send any initial parameter) ?

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This is just a conventional story, you will always need to pass arguments to an application. –  Thomas Jungblut Dec 22 '10 at 6:11
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"Java" please, not "JAVA". –  Mike Clark Dec 22 '10 at 6:12
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@Mike Clark - BILLY MAYS HERE WITH JAVA!!! –  THE DOCTOR Dec 22 '10 at 6:13
    
@mr.Flamer Java is basically extended version of C or C++.Concepts of passing array comes from that side in Java 1.1.But now we are in age of Java 1.6 and 1.7 is also will be in market in near future. So why it is conventional till now instead of adopting new way? –  Sanjay Jain Dec 22 '10 at 6:46
    
@Sanjay Why is this a problem for you? Beeing accepted for a long time is a pro argument for a convention. There is no more efficient way to pass arguments from a console to an application. –  Thomas Jungblut Dec 22 '10 at 6:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why there is no any main method which is not taking any arguments and JVM invokes it to bootstrap Java program. (If one one don't want to send any initial parameter) ?

  1. Because it is unnecessary. The JVM can trivially (and does) pass a zero length array if there are no arguments.
  2. Because providing multiple entry points doesn't make application command line parsing any easier. Indeed, if there were multiple entry points there would be more scope for platform dependencies, application bugs and/or developer confusion related to which entry point gets called.
  3. Because this is the way that many other languages implement this, and there are advantages in doing things the same way as everyone else (all other factors being equal).
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now a days programming with IDE like eclllipse, netbeans no need to pass any initial arguments.

This has absolutely nothing to do with the IDE. How do you think the IDE passes initial arguments? If you don't want to send any arguments, then the array is empty. What's the problem?

Why on earth would you suggest there be 2 entry points to your program?

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So one can use any of entry point depending on the situation. –  Sanjay Jain Dec 22 '10 at 6:24
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That's stupid. Who determines the situation? How? When? What situation? So you should copy all your code that doesn't need arguments to the different main? What issue does this solve? –  Falmarri Dec 22 '10 at 6:30
    
What the issues Method Overloading solves? If you want method with same name with different arguments or with no arguments. –  Sanjay Jain Dec 22 '10 at 6:37
    
About How & When For every method in Java one know while writing what type of argument it will take and when it will be called? –  Sanjay Jain Dec 22 '10 at 6:39
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@Sanjay: Its a general syntax which is used in both case; When its suppiled initial arguments and when not.if there no argument to pass at that time It will take zero length. Rest is known to everyone. –  Hardik Mishra Mar 8 '12 at 8:52

Think if it this way: the interface for applications/executables is that they take an array of Strings as parameters. If your particular implementation doesn't actually need any parameters fine, but there's no need to complicate the interface by adding another form of main.

And there are many GUI programs that do take parameters. For example, whenever you "Open" a file in Explorer on Windows or a file browser on Linux (and the same may be true of Finder on the Mac but I don't know for sure) the application is executed with the filename as a parameter.

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