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For a svn precommit hook, I want to strip leading spaces (there are surely no tabs present) on lines with certain keywords in them before committing them to the server. For example the line

    MACRO_1 (ABC, "Some String");

shall be matched and the leading spaces before MACRO_1 shall be removed. Currently, I have the following expression to match:

   if($line =~ /^\s+MACRO_1|MACRO_2|MACRO_3|MACRO_4.*/) {
     print "Stripping leading space on line $line\n";
     $line =~ s/^\s*//gsxm;   # strip leading spaces
   }

When I look at the console, I get the following output:

Stripping leading space on line MACRO_1;
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_2;
Stripping leading space on line     MACRO_3 (ABC, "Some String");
Stripping leading space on line  MACRO_1;
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_2;
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_1(123);
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_2(123);
Stripping leading space on line             MACRO_1;
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_2;
Stripping leading space on line MACRO_1;

This seems a bit confusing to me since there are lines with no leading space that I thought would not be matched by \s+ which is in my opinion one or more spaces.

What's the problem?

share|improve this question
    
None of those modifiers (/gsxm) are useful for the substitution you're doing (assuming that $line really does contain a single line). In fact, they make it slower, since /m allows ^ to match after embedded newlines and /g means it has to look for another match. –  cjm Dec 22 '10 at 7:21
    
Was a copy-and-paste line. Thanks for the hint! –  eckes Dec 22 '10 at 7:27
    
Using cut'n'paste code like that can be very dangerous. Specifically, the /x modifier says to ignore whitespace in the regex. The string "toy boat" does not match /toy boat/x, for example. –  Andy Lester Dec 22 '10 at 20:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The | has the lowest precedence among the regex operators.

So the following is an incorrect regex to match a string containing either only foo or only bar:

^foo|bar$

because it'll be treated as:

(^foo)|(bar$)

which matches any string beginning with foo or ending in bar; so it matches for example foo1 and 1bar.

The correct regex would be ^(?:foo|bar)$

Similarly in your case the correct regex is:

if($line =~ /^\s+(?:MACRO_1|MACRO_2|MACRO_3|MACRO_4).*/) {

Also note that there is no need of the trailing .*.

You can shorten your regex as:

if($line =~ /^\s+MACRO_[1-4]/) {
share|improve this answer
    
Well, if there are no leading spaces, then it doesn't need to match, because there's nothing to strip. –  cjm Dec 22 '10 at 7:18
    
Thanks for pointing that out! –  eckes Dec 22 '10 at 7:19
1  
@cjm: Right. I've mentioned that in my last sentence. Hard to see how his regex matched MACRO_1; which has no leading space. It is matching it because we see it in the output. –  codaddict Dec 22 '10 at 7:20
    
unless $& or $' are used, that trailing .* serves no purpose –  ysth Dec 22 '10 at 7:36
    
What is the purpose of the ?: in if($line =~ /^\s+(?:MACRO_1|MACRO_2|MACRO_3|MACRO_4).*/) { ? –  freshWoWer Jan 17 '11 at 20:58

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