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I am trying to extract char arrays from a buffer but stops working after it extracts the first char array.

char *msg = "1~Message~ILOVEYOU\r\n2~Message~Doyouloveme?\r\n3~Message~OfcourseIdo!Not!\r\n";
char tempbuffer[1024];
char *tbuf;

tbuf = &tempbuffer[0];

/* Start parsing */
while (*msg != '\0') {

    while(*msg != '\n') {

        while (*msg != '\r') {
            *tbuf = *msg;
            msg++;
            tbuf++;
        } /* closing '\r' */

        msg++;
        tbuf++;
    } /* closing '\n' */

    *tbuf = '\0';

    /* Printout buffer for debugging purposes */
    printf("x %s\n", tempbuffer);

    /* Clear tempbuffer before starting to parse the buffer again */
    memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof((char) 1024));
} /* closing '\0' */

return 0;

}

The printf shows 1~Message~ILOVEYOU and it stops working. I am expecting the following output

1~Message~ILOVEYOU
2~Message~Doyouloveme?
3~Message~OfcourseIdo!NOT!

Any ideas?

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C is just a bit less arcane than assembler. LOL! –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 8:37
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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to reset tbuf to point back to the start of tempbuffer before you start the 2nd and subsequent loops.

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Thanks Jackson! tbuf = &tempbuffer[0]; –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 8:33
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Some problems I could see:

1: Incorrect argument to memset.

Change

memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof((char) 1024));

to

memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof(tempbuffer));

Actually there is no real need for memset here.

2: Not incrementing the pointer msg when you encounter a \n.

Add

msg++;

before/after

*tbuf = '\0';

3: Reset tbuf to the start of the array at the start of each iteration

Add

tbuf = &tempbuffer[0];

Inside the first while loop.

4: *tbuf = '\0'; should be *(tbuf-1) = '\0';

as you've already incremented tbuf at this point.

See it work

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Got it, codaddict! –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 8:34
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Use a debugger and step through your programm. Or do it manually with pen and paper. What happens when you encounter the first '\n'? What happens, afterwards? You are stuck on that '\n' because you never move the read-pointer after printing the parsed message.

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1  
like he said, and the memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof((char) 1024)); should be memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof(tempbuffer)); –  kellogs Dec 22 '10 at 8:18
    
It worked! -> tbuf = &tempbuffer[0]; –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 8:33
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*tbuf='\0' should be *(tbuf-1) because you add the terminating zero after one unnecessary simbol. And why you need to call memset. You can write over the old data in the buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Dani, nice catch for tbuf. For memset, i just want to be sure there are no funny stuff. –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 15:03
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Here's the fixed code...

Problems:

  1. sizeof was wrong
  2. You did not increment msg after each '\n'
  3. You did not set tbuf back to the beginning of tempbuffer after each '\n'
  4. While it's not always reported as an error, you were missing some include files, which can cause problems
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>



char *msg = "1~Message~ILOVEYOU\r\n2~Message~Doyouloveme?\r\n3~Message~OfcourseIdo!Not!\r\n";
char tempbuffer[1024];
char *tbuf = &tempbuffer[0];

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{

    argc = argc;
    argv[0] = argv[0];

    /* Start parsing */
    while( *msg != '\0' )
    {

        while( *msg != '\n' )
        {
            while( *msg != '\r' )
            {
                *tbuf = *msg;
                msg++;
                tbuf++;
            }
            msg++;
            tbuf++;
        }

        *tbuf = '\0';

        /* Printout buffer for debugging purposes */
        printf("x %s\n", tempbuffer);

        /* Clear tempbuffer before starting to parse the buffer again */
        memset(tempbuffer, 0, sizeof(tempbuffer));
        tbuf = &tempbuffer[0];
        msg++;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks JimR, you are right on all counts! –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 15:02
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i suggest u look at the string function strtok..if u want a simpler code than the one presented let me know

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Hey Syntax_Error, I could use strtok - as a matter of fact, had been using strtok, but I'm not happy about it being not threadfriendly. My requirement was to parse "\r\n", followed by the "~". I looked at strtok_r and have no clue (after reading all the examples) how to use strtok_r. –  Poliquin Dec 22 '10 at 15:05
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  Rostyslav Dzinko Aug 17 '12 at 13:54
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