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I am looking for a command that will accept as input multiple lines of text, each line containing a single integer, and output the sum of these integers.

As a bit of background, I have a log file which includes timing measurements, so through grepping for the relevant lines, and a bit of sed reformatting I can list all of the timings in that file. I'd like to work out the total however, and my mind has gone blank as to any command I can pipe this intermediate output to in order to do the final sum. I've always used expr in the past, but unless it runs in RPN mode I don't think it's going to cope with this (and even then it would be tricky).

What am I missing? Given that there are probably several ways to achieve this, I'll be happy to read (and upvote) any approach that works, even if someone else has already posted a different solution that does the job.

Related question: Shortest command to calculate the sum of a column of output on Unix? (credits @Andrew)


Update: Wow, as expected there are some nice answers here. Looks like I'll definitely have to give awk deeper inspection as a command-line tool in general!

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2  
This is very similar to a question I asked a while ago: stackoverflow.com/questions/295781/… –  Andrew Jan 16 '09 at 17:35
3  
I really like this question for the fact that there are a lot of possible correct (or at least working) answers. –  Francisco Canedo Jan 16 '09 at 22:06

35 Answers 35

up vote 477 down vote accepted

Bit of awk should do it?

awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}' mydatafile
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8  
very nice and compact, gotta love awk! –  Jay Jan 16 '09 at 15:55
15  
+1 for knowing i'm not the only awk fan left in the world. :) –  falstro Jan 16 '09 at 15:59
3  
There's a lot of awk love in this room! I like how a simple script like this could be modified to add up a second column of data just by changing the $1 to $2 –  Paul Dixon Jan 16 '09 at 16:02
1  
There's not a practical limit, since it will process the input as a stream. So, if it can handle a file of X lines, you can be pretty sure it can handle X+1. –  Paul Dixon Feb 25 '12 at 8:36
3  
I once wrote a rudimentary mailing list processer with an awk script run via the vacation utility. Good times. :) –  L S Mar 7 '12 at 16:05

Paste typically merges lines of multiple files, but it can also be used to convert individual lines of a file into a single line. THe Delimeter flag allows you to pass a x+x type equation to bc.

paste -s -d+ infile|bc
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64  
+1. How come I have been using Linux for over a decade and never heard of paste? –  Thomas Jul 2 '10 at 12:03
1  
Very nice! I would have put a space before the "+", just to help me parse it better, but that was very handy for piping some memory numbers through paste & then bc. –  khedron Sep 8 '10 at 5:34
7  
this is way cooler than the awk solution. –  Kevin Feb 1 '12 at 18:57
23  
Much easier to remember and type than the awk solution. Also, note that paste can use a dash - as the filename - which will allow you to pipe the numbers from the output of a command into paste's standard output without the need to create a file first: <commands> | paste -sd+ - | bc –  George Mar 20 '12 at 19:15
1  
I have a file with 100 million numbers. The awk command takes 21s; the paste command takes 41s. But good to meet 'paste' nevertheless! –  Abhi Jan 25 '13 at 6:07

Plain bash:

$ cat numbers.txt 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
$ sum=0; while read num ; do sum=$(($sum + $num)); done < numbers.txt ; echo $sum
55
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4  
heh. Looks familiar :-) –  Jay Jan 16 '09 at 16:17
7  
SO popped up something like "6 new answers have been posted while you tried to remember the correct syntax of bash while". One of those was yours, but I posted anyway. You earned my +1, though :D –  rjack Jan 16 '09 at 16:46
1  
A smaller one liner: stackoverflow.com/questions/450799/… –  Khaja Minhajuddin Oct 11 '11 at 1:51

The one-liner version in Python:

$ python -c "import sys; print sum(int(l) for l in sys.stdin)"
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5  
Shorter version would be python -c"import sys; print(sum(map(int, sys.stdin)))" –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 17 '09 at 12:39
1  
I love this answer for its ease of reading and flexibility. I needed the average size of files smaller than 10Mb in a collection of directories and modified it to this: find . -name '*.epub' -exec stat -c %s '{}' \; | python -c "import sys; nums = [int(n) for n in sys.stdin if int(n) < 10000000]; print(sum(nums)/len(nums))" –  Paul Whipp Oct 23 '12 at 0:33
perl -lne '$x += $_; END { print $x; }' < infile.txt
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4  
And I added them back: "-l" ensures that output is LF-terminated as shell `` backticks and most programs expect, and "<" indicates this command can be used in a pipeline. –  j_random_hacker Jan 16 '09 at 16:08
1  
No worries J.F. :) –  j_random_hacker Jan 16 '09 at 16:41

Pure and short bash.

f=$(cat numbers.txt)
echo $(( ${f//$'\n'/+} ))
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3  
This is the best solution because it does not create any subprocess if you replace first line with f=$(<numbers.txt). –  loentar Jun 19 '13 at 6:12
dc -f infile -e '[+z1<r]srz1<rp'

Edit: Since this answer got so many votes "for obscurity", here is a detailed explanation:

The expression [+z1<r]srz1<rp does the following:

[   interpret everything to the next ] as a string
  +   push two values off the stack, add them and push the result
  z   push the current stack depth
  1   push one
  <r  pop two values and execute register r if the original top-of-stack (1)
      is smaller
]   end of the string, will push the whole thing to the stack
sr  pop a value (the string above) and store it in register r
z   push the current stack depth again
1   push 1
<r  pop two values and execute register r if the original top-of-stack (1)
    is smaller
p   print the current top-of-stack

As pseudo-code:

  1. Define "add_top_of_stack" as:
    1. Remove the two top values off the stack and add the result back
    2. If the stack has two or more values, run "add_top_of_stack" recursively
  2. If the stack has two or more values, run "add_top_of_stack"
  3. Print the result, now the only item left in the stack

To really understand the simplicity and power of dc, here is a working Python script that implements some of the commands from dc and executes a Python version of the above command:

### Implement some commands from dc
registers = {'r': None}
stack = []
def add():
    stack.append(stack.pop() + stack.pop())
def z():
    stack.append(len(stack))
def less(reg):
    if stack.pop() < stack.pop():
        registers[reg]()
def store(reg):
    registers[reg] = stack.pop()
def p():
    print stack[-1]

### Python version of the dc command above

# The equivalent to -f: read a file and push every line to the stack
import fileinput
for line in fileinput.input():
    stack.append(int(line.strip()))

def cmd():
    add()
    z()
    stack.append(1)
    less('r')

stack.append(cmd)
store('r')
z()
stack.append(1)
less('r')
p()
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12  
+1 for obscurity –  Tobia Dec 4 '13 at 10:41

You can using num-utils, although it may be overkill for what you need. This is a set of programs for manipulating numbers in the shell, and can do several nifty things, including of course, adding them up. It's a bit out of date, but they still work and can be useful if you need to do something more.

http://suso.suso.org/programs/num-utils/

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The following works in bash:

I=0

for N in `cat numbers.txt`
do
    I=`expr $I + $N`
done

echo $I
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1  
Command expansion should be used with caution when files can be arbitrarily large. With numbers.txt of 10MB, the cat numbers.txt step would be problematic. –  rjack Jan 16 '09 at 15:59
1  
Indeed, however (if not for the better solutions found here) I would use this one until I actually encountered that problem. –  Francisco Canedo Jan 16 '09 at 22:05

BASH solution, if you want to make this a command (e.g. if you need to do this frequently):

function addnums {
  TOTAL=0
  while read val; do
    TOTAL=$(($TOTAL+$val))
  done
  echo $TOTAL
}

Then usage:

cat /tmp/nums | addnums
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Pure bash and in a one-liner :-)

$ cat numbers.txt
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


$ I=0; for N in $(cat numbers.txt); do I=$(($I + $N)); done; echo $I
55
share|improve this answer

I think AWK is what you are looking for:

awk '{sum+=$1}END{print sum}'

You can use this command either by passing the numbers list through the standard input or by passing the file containing the numbers as a parameter.

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1  
It's a dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/450799/… –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 16 '09 at 16:43

I realize this is an old question, but I like this solution enough to share it.

% cat > numbers.txt
1 
2 
3 
4 
5
^D
% cat numbers.txt | perl -lpe '$c+=$_}{$_=$c'
15

If there is interest, I'll explain how it works.

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5  
Please don't. We like to pretend that -n and -p are nice semantic things, not just some clever string pasting ;) –  hobbs Oct 15 '09 at 0:37

Plain bash one liner

$ cat > /tmp/test
1 
2 
3 
4 
5
^D

$ echo $(( $(cat /tmp/test | tr "\n" "+" ) 0 ))
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I would put a big WARNING on the commonly approved solution:

awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}' mydatafile # DO NOT USE THIS!!

that is because in this form awk uses a 32 bit signed integer representation: it will overflow for sums that exceed 2147483647 (i.e., 2^31).

A more general answer (for summing integers) would be:

awk '{s+=$1} END {printf "%.0f", s}' mydatafile # USE THIS INSTEAD

P.S. I would have liked to comment the first answer, but I don't have enough reputation..

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One-liner in Racket:

racket -e '(define (g) (define i (read)) (if (eof-object? i) empty (cons i (g)))) (foldr + 0 (g))' < numlist.txt
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My fifteen cents:

$ cat file.txt | xargs  | sed -e 's/\ /+/g' | bc

Example:

$ cat text
1
2
3
3
4
5
6
78
9
0
1
2
3
4
576
7
4444
$ cat text | xargs  | sed -e 's/\ /+/g' | bc 
5148
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You can do it in python, if you feel comfortable:

Not tested, just typed:

out = open("filename").read();
lines = out.split('\n')
ints = map(int, lines)
s = sum(ints)
print s

Sebastian pointed out a one liner script:

cat filename | python -c"from fileinput import input; print sum(map(int, input()))"
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1  
@rjack: cat is used to demonstrate that script works both for stdin and for files in argv[] (like while(<>) in Perl). If your input is in a file then '<' is unnecessary. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 16 '09 at 16:06

AWK has already been mentioned, so in addition I'd like to suggest that you use this language instead of GREP and SED for scanning the original log file. A suitable AWK script can easily do the job of both and calculate the interesting value as Paul and Alf have already pointed out.

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The following should work (assuming your number is the second field on each line).

awk 'BEGIN {sum=0} \
 {sum=sum + $2} \
END {print "tot:", sum}' Yourinputfile.txt
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1  
You don't really need the {sum=0} part –  Uphill_ What '1 Oct 11 '11 at 6:19

Or use awk rather than sed : arithmetic sample

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C (not simplified)

seq 1 10 | tcc -run <(cat << EOF
#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int sum = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while(scanf("%d", &i) == 1) {
        sum = sum + i;
    }
    printf("%d\n", sum);
    return 0;
}
EOF)
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2  
(yeah I got bored and played code golf) –  Greg Bowyer Jan 24 '13 at 7:19

My version:

seq -5 10 | xargs printf "- - %s" | xargs  | bc
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Apologies in advance for readability of the backticks ("`"), but these work in shells other than bash and are thus more pasteable. If you use a shell which accepts it, the $(command ...) format is much more readable (and thus debuggable) than `command ...` so feel free to modify for your sanity.

I have a simple function in my bashrc that will use awk to calculate a number of simple math items

calc(){
  awk 'BEGIN{print '$@' }'
}

This will do +,-,*,/,^,%,sqrt,sin,cos, parenthesis ....(and more depending on your version of awk) ... you could even get fancy with printf and format floating point output, but this is all I normally need

for this particular question, I would simply do this for each line:

calc `echo $@|tr " " "+"`

so the code block to sum each line would look something like this:

while read LINE || [ "$LINE" ]; do
  calc `echo $LINE|tr " " "+"` #you may want to filter out some lines with a case statement here
done

That's if you wanted to only sum them line by line. However for a total of every number in the datafile

VARS=`<datafile`
calc `echo ${VARS// /+}`

btw if I need to do something quick on the desktop, I use this:

xcalc() { 
  A=`calc $@`
  A=`Xdialog --stdout --inputbox "Simple calculator" 0 0 $A`
  [ $A ] && xcalc $A
}
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With jq:

seq 10 | jq -s 'reduce .[] as $item (0; . + $item)'
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one simple solution would be to write a program to do it for you. This could probably be done pretty quickly in python, something like:

sum = 0
file = open("numbers.txt","R")
for line in file.readlines(): sum+=int(line)
file.close()
print sum

I haven't tested that code, but it looks right. Just change numbers.txt to the name of the file, save the code to a file called sum.py, and in the console type in "python sum.py"

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$ cat n
2
4
2
7
8
9
$ perl -MList::Util -le 'print List::Util::sum(<>)' < n
32

Or, you can type in the numbers on the command line:

$ perl -MList::Util -le 'print List::Util::sum(<>)'
1
3
5
^D
9

However, this one slurps the file so it is not a good idea to use on large files. See j_random_hacker's answer which avoids slurping.

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A lua interpreter is present on all fedora-based systems [fedora,RHEL,CentOS,korora etc. because it is embedded with rpm-package(the package of package manager rpm), i.e rpm-lua] and if u want to learn lua this kind of problems are ideal(you'll get your job done as well).

cat filname | lua -e "sum = 0;for i in io.lines() do sum=sum+i end print(sum)"

and it works. Lua is verbose though, you might have to endure some repeated keyboard stroke injury :)

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#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    double x = 0, total = 0;
    while (std::cin >> x)
        total += x;
    if (!std::cin.eof())
        return 1;
    std::cout << x << '\n';
}
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