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Looking for some insight as to whether an Upsert (insert or if exists, then update) procedure is considered bad practice in database programming. I work in SQL server if that bears any relevance.

At a place I worked some months ago, the the resident DB guru stated in newly written db coding standards (most of which I agreed with), that Upserts should be avoided.

I can't really see a logical reason for this, and consider my self reasonably conscious of good programming practice. I think they are useful for straight forward data management and help to avoid excessive stored procedure numbers.

Looking for some insight / discussion that will help me come to a conclusion on this.

Thanks.

Update In response to comments:

The specific context I refer to is the creation or update of a domain entity data representation in the database. Say for example a "Person" object exists as a representation of the "Person" table in the database. I simply need a mechanism for creating a new Person, or updating an existing one. Here I have the option of creating an Upsert stored procedure, or two separate stored procedures - one for Update, and one for Insert.

Any advantages or disadvantages in anyones view?

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From an Oracle perspective, use the MERGE statement instead. –  DCookie Dec 22 '10 at 15:37
    
MERGE also exists in SQL Server (2005+ i believe) –  RPM1984 Jan 12 '11 at 11:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The primary problem is overwriting an existing record when the intention is to add a new record because whatever was selected as the key is duplicated. Say a login name for example. You see that login exists so you update when you should have kicked back an error that the login is a duplicate.

A second problem is with resurrecting a deleted record. Say process "A" queries the record, process "B" deletes it, and then process "A" submits a change. The record that was intended to be deleted is now back in the database rather than passing an exception back to "A" that it was deleted.

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Thanks, this was what I was after - two good examples of where this sort of code can cause issues. –  gb2d Dec 22 '10 at 14:50

I like to program on purpose.

Either I'm creating something, in which case I would want the insert to fail (duplicate) if there already was a entity there. Or, I'm updating something that I know is there, in which case I'd like the update to fail (which actually doesn't happen).

With upsert/merge this get kind of fuzzy. Did I or did I not succed? Did I partially succeed? Some of the values in the row are mine (from insert) and some of them was there before?

Having said that, Upserts are useful (which is why they were implemented to begin with) and banning them would be just silly. That's like banning roads because criminals use them to get away from the cops. There are an infinite number of cases where upserts are the only resonable way of doing things. And anyone who have worked with synchronizing of data between systems knows this.

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Depends what you talk about. Data? Well, that is determined by data manipulation processes, or? If I need to insert OR update, then I need to do that. if it is about schema objects, similar.

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1  
Indeed. Very few methods or practices are bad by themselves, the context and business logic is absolutely crucial here. –  Piskvor Dec 22 '10 at 10:04
    
The specific context I refer to is the creation or update of a domain entity data representation in the database. Say for example a "Person" object exists as a representation of the "Person" table in the database. I simply need a mechanism for creating a new Person, or updating an existing one. Here I have the option of creating an Upsert stored procedure, or two separate stored procedures - one for Update, and one for Insert. –  gb2d Dec 22 '10 at 10:45
    
Pretty often I have an upsert method with another parameter whether creation is actually allowed in this case (sometimes I dont want). –  TomTom Dec 22 '10 at 11:40

The objection in the first example of two processes --where a second process "resurrects" a deleted record by adding a new one with the same key -- is only valid in specific instances which would result from either poor design OR would happen regardless if an "upsert" procedure wrote the record with the identical key or two separate procedures wrote the inserted record.

Where an identical key must be avoided, an auto-incrementing identity key is used in the insert. Where an identical key does not need to be avoided, good database design has to be implemented to avoid creating "phantom joins". For example, in the telecommunications world telephone numbers are often reused and are a "unique" key. They cannot be the primary key because person #2 might "inherit" the phone number but should likely not "inherit" person #1's overdue unpaid bill or call history, etc. So a combination of an auto incrementing primary key plus service dates or other unique indentifiers would be used in any join logic to prevent bad data chaining.

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