Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following is a basic implementation of the Xorshift RNG (copied from the Wikipedia):

uint32_t xor128(void) {
  static uint32_t x = 123456789;
  static uint32_t y = 362436069;
  static uint32_t z = 521288629;
  static uint32_t w = 88675123;
  uint32_t t;

  t = x ^ (x << 11);
  x = y; y = z; z = w;
  return w = w ^ (w >> 19) ^ (t ^ (t >> 8));
}

I understand that w is the returned value and x, y and z are the state ("memory") variables. However, I can't understand the purpose of more than one memory variable. Can anyone explain me this point?

Also, I tried to copy the above code to Python:

class R2:
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = x = 123456789
        self.y = 362436069
        self.z = 521288629
        self.w = 88675123
    def __call__(self):
        t = self.x ^ (self.x<<11)
        self.x = self.y
        self.y = self.z
        self.z = self.w
        w = self.w
        self.w = w ^ (w >> 19) ^(t ^ (t >> 8))
        return self.w

Then, I have generated 100 numbers and plotted their log10 values:

r2 = R2()
x2 = [math.log10(r2()) for _ in range(100)]
plot(x2, '.g')

Here is the output of the plot:

plot

And this what happens when 10000 (and not 100) numbers are generated: plot

The overall tendency is very clear. And don't forget that the Y axis is log10 of the actual value.

Pretty strange behavior, don't you think?

share|improve this question
    
The log10 output should've been your clue, log10 of max 32-bit is 9.something, not 100. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 22 '10 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The problem here is of course that you're using Python to do this.

Python has a notion of big integers, so even though you are copying an implementation that deals with 32-bit numbers, Python just says "I'll just go ahead and keep everything for you".

If you try this instead:

x2 = [r2() for _ in range(100)]
print(x2);

You'll notice that it produces ever-longer numbers, for instance here's the first number:

252977563114

and here's the last:

8735276851455609928450146337670748382228073854835405969246191481699954934702447147582960645

Here's code that has been fixed to handle this:

...
def __call__(self):
    t = self.x ^ (self.x<<11) & 0xffffffff                   # <-- keep 32 bits
    self.x = self.y
    self.y = self.z
    self.z = self.w
    w = self.w
    self.w = (w ^ (w >> 19) ^(t ^ (t >> 8))) & 0xffffffff    # <-- keep 32 bits
    return self.w
...
share|improve this answer

"However, I can't understand the purpose of more than one memory variable" - if you need to 'remember' 128 bits then you need 4 x 32bit integers.

As to the very strange distribution of 100 randoms, no idea! I could understand perhaps if you had generated a few million, and the steps in the graph were artifacts, but not 100.

share|improve this answer

And with a generator:

def xor128():
  x = 123456789
  y = 362436069
  z = 521288629
  w = 88675123
  while True:
    t = (x ^ (x<<11)) & 0xffffffff
    (x,y,z) = (y,z,w)
    w = (w ^ (w >> 19) ^ (t ^ (t >> 8))) & 0xffffffff
    yield w
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.