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Looking at the E4X implementation in ActionScript, it occurs to me that they had to figure out how to do three things that I am not sure can be done within ActionScript regularly:

Properties/Getters prefixed with @: var myAttribute = xmlPerson.@name;

Nameless functions for filtering: xmlData.person.(/* predicate */)

lambda syntax for predicates: xmlData.person.(@name == "Brian")

So here is my question: Are these just one-off capabilities (much like Vector.<>) they put in just for E4X, therefore keeping out of reach for us? Or do we, as ActionScript developers, have access to these features?

More specifically, I'd love to get access to the expression tree of that lambda predicate for my own code (not tied to the XML classes in any way).

I figured out that this is called the "filter operator"... but I am not sure how to harness it. Not sure I can... since ActionScript does not allow for operator overloading :(

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the only things in as3 that came to my mind after your examples are metadata tags : help.adobe.com/en_US/flex/using/… –  www0z0k Dec 22 '10 at 13:53
    
Filter operators are supported! see my answer for details ... –  Jarvis Jan 6 '11 at 20:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I know, it's not possible to harness the E4X syntax for other types of objects. It's really sad, because there's a lot of potential in it; especially the lamdba syntax.

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I think what you need is the Proxy class. The mechanism of this class is quite interesting, allowing you to handle dynamic access to non-existent but algorithmically definable properties. In order to do this, you subclass the flash.utils.Proxy class.

http://livedocs.adobe.com/flash/9.0/ActionScriptLangRefV3/flash/utils/Proxy.html

The dynamic getter / setter logic is easy to implement. However attribute (@) access and the lambda syntax are tricky. Proxy getters do not see the @ character for some reason and filter methods result in runtime errors. You can see them below:

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;

    public class ProxyTest extends Sprite {
        public function ProxyTest() {
            var obj:ProxyObject = new ProxyObject();

            trace(obj.testingDefault); // Invokes default logic.
            trace(obj.@testingAttributes); // Invokes default logic. :(
            trace(obj["(@testingLambda == 'testing')"]); // Invokes lambda logic.
            trace(obj.filter("@testing == 'testing'")); // Just an idea

            trace(obj.(@testing = "testing")); // Throws Error #1123: Filter operator not supported 
        }
    }
}

import flash.utils.Proxy;
import flash.utils.flash_proxy;

dynamic class ProxyObject extends Proxy {

    public function ProxyObject() {
    }

    override flash_proxy function callProperty(propName:*, ... args):* {
        var name:String = propName.toString();

        switch (name.charAt(0)) {
            case '(':
                trace("Lambda logic.");
                break;
            case '@':
                trace("Attribute logic.");
                break;
            default:
                trace("Default logic.");
                break;
        }

        return "CALL: " + propName;
    }

    override flash_proxy function getProperty(propName:*):* {
        var name:String = propName.toString();

        switch (name.charAt(0)) {
            case '(':
                trace("Lambda logic.");
                break;
            case '@':
                trace("Attribute logic.");
                break;
            default:
                trace("Default logic.");
                break;
        }

        return "GET: " + propName;
    }

    override flash_proxy function setProperty(propName:*, value:*):void {
    }

}
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1  
The Proxy class is cool, and I use it for several things, but it doesn't buy me much here. For lambda-like expressions, I have considered just sending a string in like you suggested... "data.prop == true" but I loose all compiler-based checks and require an eval (of some sort). At that point, I'd rather just type function(data):Boolean{return data.prop == true} and let my compiler tell me if there is anything wrong and not take an eval hit. I think what I really want is to override the .() operator (the filter operator) but ActionScript doesn't let you override operators :( –  Brian Genisio Dec 22 '10 at 14:12

I know I'm late, but Brain, it appears that filter operators ARE supported in AS3!!

Checkout this error I got:

TypeError: Error #1123: Filter operator not supported on type XYZ

On this line of code:

object.(getChildByName("image") as Sprite).addChild(img);

Well.. I suppose we figure out the rest ...

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The only problem: AS3 does not support operator overloading... so... I don't know of any way of actually using the filter operator. :( –  Brian Genisio Jan 7 '11 at 1:42
    
The fact that there's an error to this effect, must mean that filter operators are supported. Don't have the time to go hunting but I ask that you investigate a bit... Adobe never does a hodgepodge/partial job on anything. If you see errors, you will also see functionality to match. –  Jarvis Jan 7 '11 at 8:41

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