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It just happened to me I wondered how resources are freed in the following case.

class Base {
  Resource *r;

public:
  Base() { /* ... */ }
  ~Base() {
    delete r; 
  }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
  Derived() { /* ... */ }
  ~Derived() {
    /* Suddenly something here throws! */
  }
};

int main() {
  try {
    Derived d;
  } catch(...) {
    /* what happened with Base::r !? */
  }
}

Will the base class destructor be called if the derived class destructor throws? Or will there be a leak?

share|improve this question
6  
From memory, the Standard's definitions of what will happen if a destructor throws are so incredibly complex and generally awful that nobody ever, ever throws from a destructor. I'm also pretty sure that all Standard containers assume that destructors are nothrow. Basically, although I think that technically, it is legal and defined, the reality is that nobody does and for very good reason, so don't ever do it. –  Puppy Dec 22 '10 at 11:29
1  
The sample you have there shouldn't be a problem. d is going out of scope just in the normal way of things. Where things could get nasty is if the reason d is being destructed is that the stack is getting unwound as part of handling another exception. It's that possibility that leads to rules of thumb about never throwing in a destructor. –  Kate Gregory Dec 22 '10 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

According to §15.2/2:

An object that is partially constructed or partially destroyed will have destructors executed for all of its fully constructed subobjects, that is, for subobjects for which the constructor has completed execution and the destructor has not yet begun execution.

So the base class destructor should be called. That is, just like we know this will clean up the base class:

#include <iostream>

struct foo
{
    ~foo()
    {
        std::cout << "clean" << std::endl;
    }
};

struct bar : foo
{
    bar()
    { // foo is initialized...
        throw 0; // ...so its destructor is run
    }
};

int main()
{
    try
    {
        bar b;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        std::cerr << "caught" << std::endl;
    }
}

And that this will clean up the member:

#include <iostream>

struct foo
{
    ~foo()
    {
        std::cout << "clean" << std::endl;
    }
};

struct bar
{
    ~bar()
    { // f has been initialized...
        throw 0; // ...so its destructor will run
    }

    foo f;
};

int main()
{
    try
    {
        bar b;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        std::cerr << "caught" << std::endl;
    }
}

This will also clean up the base class:

#include <iostream>

struct foo
{
    ~foo()
    {
        std::cout << "clean" << std::endl;
    }
};

struct bar : foo
{
    ~bar()
    { // foo has been initialized...
        throw 0; // ...so its destructor will run
    }
};

int main()
{
    try
    {
        bar b;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        std::cerr << "caught" << std::endl;
    }
}

That's my understanding of the quote.

share|improve this answer
    
In VC++ 9 base destructor is indeed called. –  sharptooth Dec 22 '10 at 11:29
    
@sharp: And in MSVC10. @Kirill: Thanks, I'm rusty. :) –  GManNickG Dec 22 '10 at 11:30
1  
Thanks for the answer. I think that's spot-on! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 11:32
1  
@wqking, I would think the compiler needs to add a try...catch around destructor calls anyway, to be able to call std::terminate in case the exception escapes the destructor while another exception is active currently. Not sure about the details though. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 11:59
1  
Presumably the base destructor isn't called in the case int main() { Derived d; throw 0; }, because the rule about immediately calling terminate() disrupts the required sequence of destructor calls? –  Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 13:56

The base class destructor is indeed called. Sample code:

#include 
#include 

class Base {
public:
  Base() { /* ... */ }
  ~Base() {
    printf("Base\n");
  }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
  Derived() { /* ... */ }
  ~Derived() {
    printf("Derived\n");
    throw 1;
  }
};

int main() {
  try {
    Derived d;
  } catch(...) {
    printf("CAUGHT!\n");
  }
}

This prints:

Derived
Base
CAUGHT!
share|improve this answer
1  
Good. But GMan answered before. –  Alexey Malistov Dec 22 '10 at 11:50
1  
@Alexey - it isn't a race, it is the quality of the answer that counts. –  Brian Neal Dec 22 '10 at 14:55
    
@Brian: Not to toot my own horn, but since my answer already existed, there isn't really anything more to add to directly answer the question. Arguably this answer is worse because it's only a proof that some compiler under this specific condition produced a specific output, not a proof that it's guaranteed. –  GManNickG Dec 24 '10 at 4:42
    
@GMan - my comment was on Alexey's comment, not on this answer or yours. Since you brought it up, I agree with what you said. I just don't like the perception that the first answer is always the one you award upvotes to. –  Brian Neal Dec 25 '10 at 0:04
    
@Brian: Gotcha. I think Alexey had what I said in mind, but just didn't say it. –  GManNickG Dec 25 '10 at 5:36

The base destructor will get called.

In Effective C++, Meyers recommends that exceptions shouldn't leave destructors. Catch the exception inside the destructor and handle it, swallow it or terminate.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a rationale for your claim? –  GManNickG Dec 22 '10 at 11:32
1  
You write "I don't think". And I do think. And what? OP has very high reputation score and obviously wants to get more clear answer. –  Alexey Malistov Dec 22 '10 at 11:36
    
I wrote "I don't think" because that is what I understood. I have now checked, and yes the base destructors are indeed called. There is still an issue over how much of the derived class destructor has been run before the exception. –  DanS Dec 22 '10 at 11:56
1  
The thing is that I think or I don't think are not answers. Link to Meyers is not answer too. It's a recomendation only. OP wants to know Will the base class destructor be called? and why obviously? –  Alexey Malistov Dec 22 '10 at 12:01
1  
@Alexey Malistov - Not to demean or praise anybody. Don't assume high scores means an expert or low scores a fool. –  DumbCoder Dec 22 '10 at 13:15

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