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Problem:

I would like to write some test/emulation code that emulates a serial port connection. The real code looks like this:

DUT <- UART -> testtool.exe

My plan is to use create a test application (CodeUnderTest.out) on linux that forks to launch testool.out with two (read & write) named pipes as arguments. But I cannot figure out how to make all the pipe IO non-blocking!

The setup would look like this:.

CodeUnderTest.out <- named pipes -> testTool.out (lauched from CodeUnderTest.out)

I have tried opening the pipes as following:

open(wpipe,O_WRONLY|O_NONBLOCK);
open(rpipe,O_RDONLY|O_NONBLOCK);

But the write blocks until the reader opens the wpipe. Next I tried the following:

open(wpipe,O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK);
open(rpipe,O_RDONLY|O_NONBLOCK);

But then the reader of the first message never gets any data (doesn't block though)

I also tried adding open and close calls around each message, but that didn't work either...

Test code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

pid_t pid;
char* rpipe, *wpipe,*x;
FILE *rh,*wh;
int rfd,wfd;

void openrpipe( void )
   {
   rfd = open(rpipe,O_RDONLY|O_NONBLOCK);
   rh = fdopen(rfd,"rb");
   printf("%sopeningr %x\n",x,rh);
   }
void openwpipe( void )
   {
   //Fails when reader not already opened
   //wfd = open(wpipe,O_WRONLY|O_NONBLOCK);
   wfd = open(wpipe,O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK);
   wh = fdopen(wfd,"wb");
   printf("%sopeningw %x\n",x,wh);
   }
void closerpipe( void )
   {
   int i;
   i = fclose(rh);
   printf("%sclosingr %d\n",x,i);
   }
void closewpipe( void )
   {
   int i;
   i = fclose(wh);
   printf("%sclosingw %d\n",x,i);
   }
void readpipe( char* expect, int len)
   {
   char buf[1024];
   int i=0;
   printf("%sreading\n",x);
   while(i==0)
      {
      //printf(".");
      i = fread(buf,1,len,rh);
      }
   printf("%sread (%d) %s\n",x,i,buf);
   }
void writepipe( char* data, int len)
   {
   int i,j;
   printf("%swriting\n",x);
   i = fwrite(data,1,len,rh);
   j = fflush(rh); //No help!
   printf("%sflush %d\n",x,j);
   printf("%swrite (%d) %s\n",x,i,data);
   }
int main(int argc, char **argv)
   {
   rpipe = "readfifo";
   wpipe = "writefifo";
   x = "";
   pid = fork();
   if( pid == 0)
      {
      wpipe = "readfifo";
      rpipe = "writefifo";
      x = "   ";
      openrpipe();
      openwpipe();
      writepipe("paul",4);
      readpipe("was",3);
      writepipe("here",4);
      closerpipe();
      closewpipe();
      exit(0);
      }
   openrpipe();
   openwpipe();
   readpipe("paul",4);
   writepipe("was",3);
   readpipe("here",4);
   closerpipe();
   closewpipe();
   return( -1 );
   }

BTW:

To use the testcode above you need will need to create 2 pipes in the current dir:

mkfifo ./readfifo

mkfifo ./writefifo

UPDATE:

Okay I think I have the right settings now. Please let me know if it can be done better

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

pid_t pid;
char* rpipe, *wpipe,*x;
int rfd,wfd;

FILE* openpipe( char* str, char* access )
   {
   FILE* fh;
   rfd = open(str,O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK);
   fh = fdopen(rfd,access);
   printf("%sopen(%s,%s)=%x\n",x,str,access,fh);
   return(fh);
   }
void closepipe( FILE* fh )
   {
   int i;
   i = fclose(fh);
   printf("%sclosing %d\n",x,i);
   }
void readpipe( char* expect, int len, FILE* fh)
   {
   char buf[1024];
   int i=0;
   printf("%sreading\n",x);
   while(i==0)
      {
      //printf("%c",strlen(x)?'.':'#');
      i = fread(buf,1,len,fh);
      }
   buf[i] = 0;
   printf("%sread (%d) %s\n",x,i,buf);
   }
void writepipe( char* data, int len, FILE* fh)
   {
   int i=0,j;
   printf("%swriting\n",x);
   //while(i==0)
   i = fwrite(data,1,len,fh);
   j=fflush(fh);
   printf("%sflush %d\n",x,j);
   printf("%swrite (%d) %s\n",x,i,data);
   }
int main(int argc, char **argv)
   {
   FILE *rh,*wh;
   rpipe = "readfifo";
   wpipe = "writefifo";
   x = "";
   pid = fork();
   if( pid == 0)
      {
      FILE *rh,*wh;
      wpipe = "readfifo";
      rpipe = "writefifo";
      x = "   ";
      rh=openpipe(rpipe,"rb");
      wh=openpipe(wpipe,"wb");
      writepipe("paul",4,wh);
      readpipe("was",3,rh);
      writepipe("here",4,wh);
      closepipe(rh);
      closepipe(wh);
      exit(0);
      }
   rh=openpipe(rpipe,"rb");
   wh=openpipe(wpipe,"wb");
   readpipe("paul",4,rh);
   writepipe("was",3,wh);
   readpipe("here",4,rh);
   closepipe(rh);
   closepipe(wh);
   return( -1 );
   }
share|improve this question

Don't write to the pipe until there's a reader. You should be able to use select or poll to find out when a reader connects.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, why is that? It certainly falls outside of the UART analogy. Would this only replace the read polling (while(!fread(..)) – codebauer Dec 22 '10 at 15:40
    
@codebauer: With a UART, if you write before hooking up the serial cable, the write just goes into neverland and nothing is received. I assume you don't want that behavior either... or you could send periodically. OTOH, a UART with flow control enabled probably acts exactly like the pipe (write blocks if there is no connected reader). – Ben Voigt Dec 22 '10 at 16:00
    
If the goal is to emulate a UART, the ability to write onto an unconnected wire probably is desired. UART-level flow control is rarely used today - most often handshaking is done at the application level, and the application's handshaking algorithm probably assumes the ability to write onto an unconnected wire. To do UART emulation in this way, the application should call a wrapper function that either writes to a real uart in the hardware case or in the emulation case only writes to the pipe if it's connected and otherwise just silently discards writes. – Chris Stratton Dec 22 '10 at 17:41

In general, the best way to emulate a serial port for this kind of testing is to use a pseudo-terminal, since a serial port is a tty and so is a pty.

posix_openpt(), grantpt(), unlockpt() and ptsname() are the calls you will need. The master side is read and written by the device emulator, and the slave side is passed as the serial port to open to the program being tested.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what the advantages/differences are compared to a named pipe? Any ideas? – codebauer Dec 22 '10 at 15:41
    
@codebauer: The usual terminal control functions work on a pty (eg. tcsetattr()), and the path of the pty slave can be passed directly to the process being tested in place of the serial port device it normally uses (so no modifications to the child are required). In short it "looks" much more like a serial port on the slave side. – caf Dec 22 '10 at 21:11
    
That's a very good point, Thanks. – codebauer Dec 23 '10 at 10:28

protected by Will Dec 22 '10 at 12:56

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