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Why is the imho missing indentation of the "case" - keywords in a switch statement considered good style?

no indentation of the "case" keyword seems to be the default formatting option in about every IDE:

switch (i){
case 0:
    break;
case 1:
    break;
}

while i find this format more intuitive:

switch (i){
    case 0:
        break;
    case 1:
        break;
}

Is there some logic behind this, that eludes me?

share|improve this question
1  
Didn't realise this until now! It's probably because switch was invented before indentation)) – rodion Dec 22 '10 at 12:22
    
NB does indent switch by default (and it looks more readable for me too) – barti_ddu Dec 22 '10 at 12:37
    
2  
The official documentation doesn't follow the code convention: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/switch.html docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/jls-14.html#jls-14.11 – Roland Mar 27 '14 at 14:19
up vote 33 down vote accepted

The cases are logically labels. Many people put labels at the same indentation level as the block they are in. In my opinion, that way it's easier to read through the text.

I compare it with a timeline you can scroll through. You have markers on the time line itself, not indented into the content. You can then quickly point out where labels/markers are, without moving your eye away from the base-line.

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7  
To put it another way, the contents of the switch block are indented one level from the switch itself, but the case s are "outdented" one level from the code they're mixed in with. – Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 13:40
    
I was on the fence about this, leaning towards indenting since I thought it was a little more readable. This answer, along with the benefit of preventing excessive indentation/wrapping, changed my opinion. Thinking of the cases as labels rather than if conditions seems to help readability slightly when not indented. – Pilot_51 Sep 24 '13 at 15:52
1  
The case parts act like labels in that the flow of execution will proceed through the label from the code above to the code below without a break. I still prefer to see them indented. Without the indent it hides, to my eye, the switch statement itself, making it hard to see the start of things. But this is only a real problem when there are too many cases and that a whole 'nother problem. – Lee Meador Oct 7 '13 at 17:18

In 4 words: no blocks, no indentation.

Cases are not opening a block. In C or C++ you can even put variables declarations (but the initializers are not called, except for static variables, that's a pitfall) at the beginning of the switch block. You can do many weird things with switch, like Duff's device.

Hence, as cases are just labels, indenting them does not seem that intuitive, and not indenting is the style chosen by most styles.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't say that they are necessarily labels, because you can think of them both as labels and as syntax sugar for a sequence of if-elses. Although, since they look like labels then maybe the indentation is more appropriate that way. – rodion Dec 22 '10 at 12:56
12  
I don't think that rule describes the style in question. switch does introduce a block, and case doesn't. And yet case appears to introduce a new level of indentation, whereas switch doesn't. – Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 13:37
1  
@rodion: in terms of complexity C switch implementations are O(1) and the equivalent if-else strings are O(n). if-else expect to be followed by exactly one statement, not case, etc. You can also find references to cases as labels in C standard (didn't checked for the exact quote, but I'm quite sure I've seen it). – kriss Dec 22 '10 at 14:08
    
@Steve: switch doesn't by itself introduce a block. It is just block statement that people usually use as dependent statement that introduces the block. – Jens Gustedt Dec 22 '10 at 15:21
1  
@kriss: All automatic variable declarations are definitions. They're just not initialized. There's no harm in putting initialized variable definitions at the beginning of a switch, but the initialization will never be performed, so it's useless. Also of course, static variable definitions are valid at the beginning of a switch, regardless of whether they're initialized. – R.. Dec 22 '10 at 16:06

The 1999 official Oracle Code Conventions for the Java TM Programming Language (section 7.8) recommends a switch style where case statements are not indented relative to the switch statement as a whole.

This is a subjective choice, but Sun decided it is better if everyone stick to one style, and picked this.

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There are different indentation styles to choose from. AFAIK, none is considered better style than the others as long as you consistently use an indentation style at all. For me, indenting case labels is more readable, same goes for private, protected and public labels in classes, however, my IDE won't do the indentation my way. My code isn't as readable as I'd like it to be this way. Oh well...

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1  
same for me, i really hate cases not indented, been programming for 20+ years, but i can also buy it's a subjective matter... – rupps May 13 '13 at 0:21

Maybe it is to keep the same indentation level as its logical equivalent expressed in if statments? That is:

switch(i){
case 0:
  //do something 1
case 1:
  //do something 2
}

Would look similar to its logical equivalent:

if(i==0){
  //do something 1
}else if(i==1){
  //do something 2
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Probably not - switch/case is usually implemented by a jumptable if possible, not an if/else snake. – Johan Kotlinski Dec 22 '10 at 23:01
    
@kotlinski: thanks for that tip, good to know it ;) – mingos Dec 23 '10 at 23:46

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