Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's what I've got:

private static int countNumChars(String s) {
    for(char c : s.toCharArray()){
        if (Equals(c," "))
    }
}

But that code says it cannot find Symbol for that method. I remember Java having a comparer like this... Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
1  
empty space - a ' ' with no content? –  Andreas_D Dec 22 '10 at 14:40
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 59 down vote accepted
if (c == ' ')

char is a primitive data type, so it can be compared with ==.

Also, by using double quotes you create String constant (" "), while with single quotes it's a char constant (' ').

share|improve this answer
add comment

The code you needs depends on what you mean by "an empty space".

  • If you mean the ASCII / Latin-1 / Unicode space character (0x20) aka SP, then:

    if (ch == ' ') {
        // ...
    }
    
  • If you mean any of the traditional ASCII whitespace characters (SP, HT, VT, CR, NL), then:

    if (ch == ' ' || ch == '\t' || ch == '\r' || ch == '\n' || ch == '\x0b') {
        // ...
    }
    
  • If you mean any Unicode whitespace character, then:

    if (Character.isWhitespace(ch)) {
        // ...
    }
    

Note that there are Unicode whitespace includes additional ASCII control codes, and some other Unicode characters in higher code planes; see the javadoc for Character.isWhitespace(char).


What you wrote was this:

    if (Equals(ch, " ")) {
        // ...
    }

This is wrong on a number of levels. Firstly, the way that the Java compiler tries to interpret that is as a call to a method with a signature of boolean Equals(char, String).

  • This is wrong because no method exists, as the compiler reported in the error message.
  • Equals wouldn't normally be the name of a method anyway. The Java convention is that method names start with a lower case letter.
  • Your code (as written) was trying to compare a character and a String, but char and String are not comparable and cannot be cast to a common base type.

There is such a thing as a Comparator in Java, but it is an interface not a method, and it is declared like this:

    public interface Comparator<T> {
        public int compare(T v1, T v2);
    }

In other words, the method name is compare (not Equals), it returns an integer (not a boolean), and it compares two values that can be promoted to the type given by the type parameter.


Someone (in a deleted Answer!) said they tried this:

    if (c == " ")

That fails for two reasons:

  • " " is a String literal and not a character literal, and Java does not allow direct comparison of String and char values.

  • You should NEVER compare Strings or String literals using ==. The == operator on a reference type compares object identity, not object value. In the case of String it is common to have different objects with different identity and the same value. An == test will often give the wrong answer ... from the perspective of what you are trying to do here.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't seen Comparator<T> in Java, what's the difference to Comparable with the compareTo method? –  Felix Dombek Dec 22 '10 at 15:48
    
@Felix, you can use the Comparator interface as an extra argument to Collections.sort to provide alternative means of sorting a list of a certain type. After all, a Comparable object can only have /one/ compareTo method, so if you want to sort a list of items by various means, you'll have to use the Comparator interface. –  fwielstra Dec 28 '10 at 10:59
add comment

Since char is a primitive type, you can just write c == ' '.
You only need to call equals() for reference types like String or Character.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could use

Character.isWhitespace(c)

or any of the other available methods in the Character class.

  if (c == ' ')

also works.

share|improve this answer
    
Well it ultimately depends on if he is checking for spaces only. I mean if it contains a tab, you would get a false positive. –  Glenn Nelson Dec 22 '10 at 14:30
    
Updated. He can do what he needs directly from Character, although it is overkill. –  Corv1nus Dec 22 '10 at 14:33
add comment

My suggestion would be:

if (c == ' ')
share|improve this answer
add comment

To compare character you use the == operator:

if (c == ' ')
share|improve this answer
add comment

In this case, you are thinking of the String comparing function "String".equals("some_text"). Chars do not need to use this function. Instead a standard == comparison operator will suffice.

private static int countNumChars(String s) {
    for(char c : s.toCharArray()){
        if (c == ' ') // your resulting outcome
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

At first glance, your code will not compile. Since the nested if statement doesn't have any braces, it will consider the next line the code that it should execute. Also, you are comparing a char against a String, " ". Try comparing the values as chars instead. I think the correct syntax would be:

if(c == ' '){
   //do something here
}

But then again, I am not familiar with the "Equal" class

share|improve this answer
add comment

To compare Strings you have to use the equals keyword.

if(c.equals(""))
{
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.