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assume the following class is given:

class Base{
public:

Base() {}
Base( const Base& b) : base_attr(b.base_attr) {}

void someBaseFunction()
{ .... }

protected:

SomeType base_attr;
};

When I want a class to inherit from this one and include a new attribute for the derived class, I would write:

class Derived: public Base {
public:

Derived() {}
Derived( const Derived& d ) : derived_attr(d.derived_attr)
{
  this->base_attr = d.base_attr;
}

void SomeDerivedFunction()
{ .... }

private:

SomeOtherType derived_attr;
};

This works for me (let's ignore eventually missing semicolons or such please).

However, when I remove the "this->" in the copy constructor of the derived class, the compiler complains that "'base_attr' was not declared in this scope".

I thought that, when inheriting from a class, the protected attributes would then also be accessible directly. I did not know that the "this->" pointer was needed. I am now confused if it is actually correct what I am doing there, especially the copy-constructor of the Derived-class.

Because each Derived object is supposed to have a base_attr and a derived_attr and they obviously need to be initialized/set correctly. And because Derived is inheriting from Base, I don't want to explicitly include an attribute named "base_attr" in the Derived-class. IMHO doing so would generally destroy the idea behind inheritance, as everything would have to be defined again.


EDIT

Thank you all for the quick answers. I completely forgot the fact that the classes actually are templates.

Please, see the new examples below, which are actually compiling when including "this->" and are failing when omiting "this->" in the copy-constructor of the Derived-class: Base-class:

#include <iostream>

template<class T> 
class Base{
public:

Base() : base_attr(0) {} 
Base( const Base& b) : base_attr(b.base_attr) {} 

void baseIncrement()
{ ++base_attr; }

void printAttr()
{
        std::cout << "Base Attribute: " << base_attr << std::endl;
}

protected:

 T base_attr;
};

Derived-class:

#include  "base.hpp"

template< class T >
class Derived: public Base<T>{
public:

Derived() : derived_attr(1) {} 
Derived( const Derived& d) : derived_attr(d.derived_attr)  {  
        this->base_attr = d.base_attr;
        }  

void derivedIncrement()
{ ++derived_attr; }

protected:

 T derived_attr;
};

and for completeness also the main function:

#include "derived.hpp"

int main()
{
        Derived<int> d; 
        d.printAttr();

        d.baseIncrement();
        d.printAttr();

        Derived<int> d2(d);
        d2.printAttr();

        return 0; 
};

I am using g++-4.3.4. Although I understood now that it seems to come from the fact that I use template-class definitions, I did not quite understand what is causing the problem when using templates and why it works when not using templates. Could someone please further clarify this?

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1  
If you remove the this-> part, the code will continue to compile just fine. Contrary to what you are saying above, the compiler will not complain. What you posting above is not accurate. Most likely, you are posting fake code, which has very little (or nothing) to do with the code you were actually trying to compile. The effect you describe is possible under some specific circumstances (template base class, for example), but not in what you posted. Post real code or at least test your artificial examples before posting them. –  AndreyT Dec 22 '10 at 15:37
    
Thank you all again for your interest in this question and the hints about templates. As it turned out, this is related to template dependant name lookup which seems to be a special case of name lookups. For those with the G++, you may find this interesting: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Name-lookup.html. At least for me, it made clear basically how and why the "this"-pointer of solves the (second and real) problem. –  Shadow Dec 23 '10 at 10:58
    
Another example that IMHO nicely demonstrates what can happen during the name lookup is: cpptruths.blogspot.com/2006/09/…. While this example compiles just fine, it shows what unexpected behavior can potentially happen. Simply use "this->foo()" instead of "foo()" in the definition of "Derived<Base>::bar()" and see what happens in difference. –  Shadow Dec 23 '10 at 11:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are only seeing this if Base in some way depends on template arguments.

In that case, it's deemed too dangerous that a name like base_attr is lookup up in such a dependent base class: For some template instantiation, the name could be found in the base class, and for another instantiation, the member could be absent and the name would refer to a some namespace member.

Because this was thought to be confusing, C++ follows the consistent rule that base_attr is never lookup in a dependent base class when doing unqualified name lookup. You need to prefix the name with this-> or with the name of the class as in Derived<T>::base_attr. So when the base class doesn't declare a base_attr, the name doesn't silently refer to a potentially globally declared name, but it will just be a compile time error.

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Thank you. Unfortunately, I did not completely understood your explanation why C++ has this rule. Could you please try to explain it again? –  Shadow Dec 22 '10 at 16:39

There is no reason that this should be necessary. All member variables are implicitly accessed through this-> and I know of no language rules that specify that you should need to use this-> to access any member functions or variables.

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1  
Well.. there's one case with templates where you do need this -- It's CRTP IIRC -- but I'm unaware of any compiler who enforces it. –  Billy ONeal Dec 22 '10 at 15:36
    
@Billy: GCC (for example) enforces that dependent bases aren't searched for members unless you use this-> or qualify the member name. –  Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 15:51

I don't know why you're getting that error without seeing a compilable example, but you can write your copy constructor thus:

Derived( const Derived& d ) : Base(d.base_attr), derived_attr(d.derived_attr) {}
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using Base(d) is really calling the copy-constructor of Base. –  stefaanv Dec 22 '10 at 15:35
    
So does it automatically take care to only copy the member attributes of the base class (the base class copy ctor is at least defined in that way)? After all, an object of the derived class (here d) has an extra member attribute and the base class generally does not know how to handle that... –  Shadow Dec 23 '10 at 11:19

What compiler are you using? I'm not getting any error with g++ and nor do I see anything wrong with the code you have listed.

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