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I'm building a String called FullMemo, that would be displayed at a TMemoBox, but the problem is that I'm trying to make newlines like this:

FullMemo := txtFistMemo.Text + '\n' + txtDetails.Text

What I got is the content of txtFirstMemo the character \n, not a newline, and the content of txtDetails. What I should do to make the newline work?

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duplicated ... stackoverflow.com/questions/254407/… –  PA. Dec 22 '10 at 18:33
    
If it's duplicated, so why the answers are totally different? –  Nathan Campos Dec 26 '10 at 12:38
    
What's a TMemoBox? –  Jens Mühlenhoff Oct 25 '12 at 6:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The solution is to use #13#10 or better as Sertac suggested sLineBreak.

FullMemo := txtFistMemo.Text + #13#10 + txtDetails.Text;
FullMemo := txtFistMemo.Text + sLineBreak + txtDetails.Text;
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11  
Can also use sLineBreak. –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 22 '10 at 15:41
1  
using sLineBreak is the best approach!! –  ComputerSaysNo Dec 22 '10 at 16:46
1  
@Sertac Akyuz - +1 great tip, I haven't noticed something like this –  user532231 Dec 22 '10 at 17:48
    
Why Chr(10) works in Tlabels and not for TMemos? –  diegoaguilar Jul 13 '13 at 18:38

A more platform independent solution would be TStringList.

var
  Strings: TStrings;
begin
  Strings := TStringList.Create;
  try
    Strings.Assign(txtFirstMemo.Lines); // Assuming you use a TMemo
    Strings.AddStrings(txtDetails.Lines);
    FullMemo := Strings.Text;
  finally
    Strings.Free;
  end;
end;

To Add an empty newline you can use:

Strings.Add('');
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Use

FullMemo := txtFistMemo.Text + #13#10 + txtDetails.Text
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You don't make newlines like this, you use symbol #13:

FullMemo := txtFistMemo.Text + #13 + txtDetails.Text
    + Chr(13) + 'some more text'#13.

#13 is CR, #10 is LF, sometimes it's enough to use just CR, sometimes (when writing text files for instance) use #13#10.

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Line break on Windows is always #13#10 (or better sLineBreak as Sertac suggests). –  Jens Mühlenhoff Dec 22 '10 at 17:29
    
It's not "always" #13#10. There's no rule saying you cannot parse #13 for linebreak, even on Windows. For instance, MessageBox accepts it just fine. –  himself Dec 22 '10 at 18:06

You can declare something like this:

const 
 CRLF = #13#10;
 LBRK = CRLF+ CRLF;

in a common unit and use it in all your programs. It will be really handy.

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