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I am trying to implement a function which reads from Serial Port ( Linux) and retuns char*. The function works fine but how would I store return value from function. example of function is

char  *ReadToSerialPort()
{
 char *bufptr;
 char buffer[256];  // Input buffer/ /
 //char *bufptr;      // Current char in buffer //
 int  nbytes;       // Number of bytes read //

 bufptr = buffer;

 while ((nbytes = read(fd, bufptr, buffer+sizeof(buffer)-bufptr -1 )) > 0)
 {
  bufptr += nbytes;
  //  if (bufptr[-1] == '\n' || bufptr[-1] == '\r')
  /*if ( bufptr[sizeof(buffer) -1] == '*' && bufptr[0] == '$' )
  {
   break;
  }*/

 } // while ends


 if ( nbytes ) return bufptr;
 else return 0;


 *bufptr = '\0';

} // end ReadAdrPort


//In main
int main( int argc , char *argv[])
{ 
  char *letter;
  if(strcpy(letter,  ReadToSerialPort()) >0 )
  {
   printf("Response is %s\n",letter);
  }
}
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You should indent your code using the "{}" tool in the question editor. Mark your code and click that, alternatively do it manually by indenting all of your code at least 4 spaces. –  Victor Zamanian Dec 22 '10 at 15:47
1  
First, this is not C++, but this is C-style. Second, I even dont see where you want to store what you read in bufptr that points on buffer. Where do you want to put the data ? –  Stephane Rolland Dec 22 '10 at 15:51
    
The line "*bufptr = '\0';" will never ger executed as you return before you get there. –  DanS Dec 22 '10 at 15:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should allocate a buffer at heap with malloc, and return it. The users of your function will be responsible for deallocating the memory (and your documentation has to clearly state this!)

A simple change would be

char* buffer = (char*)malloc(256);
// beware that now `sizeof(buffer)` will be not 256 any more, but 4, so
// you have to define your constant for it.
...
if (nbytes) return buffer;
free(buffer);
return 0;

...
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{ 
    char *letter = ReadToSerialPort();
    if (letter)
    {
        printf("Response is %s\n", letter);
        free(letter);
        return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

Please note that the code *bufptr = '\0'; should be before return, not after!

EDIT
Does your code look like this:

char *ReadToSerialPort()
{
    const int buffer_size = 256;
    char *buffer = (char *)malloc(buffer_size);
    char *bufptr = buffer;
    int  nbytes;

    while ((nbytes = read(fd, bufptr, buffer+buffer_size-bufptr-1)) > 0)
    {
        bufptr += nbytes;
    }

    *bufptr = '\0';

    if (bufptr != buffer)
        return bufptr;
    // else cleaning up
    free(buffer);
    return 0;
}

I am curious where does fd come from?

share|improve this answer
    
Better to return the NULL constant rather than 0 on failure. –  Tim Post Dec 22 '10 at 16:04
    
@Tim: I copied that part from the OP's code. But you're right. –  Vlad Dec 22 '10 at 16:06
1  
@samprat: beware that sizeof behaves differently with char buffer[256] and char* buffer. I've added the comment to the answer. –  Vlad Dec 22 '10 at 16:10
    
But 0 and NULL are the same in this context. Also, sizeof buffer is not necessarily 4, it is sizeof(char *). –  Alok Singhal Dec 22 '10 at 16:20
    
Hi Guys, I have tried above sample code , but it throws segmentation fault error. I am pretty sure like its something to do with size of buffer. and since if sizeof(buffer) size =4 ... what should i do to replace it in while stmt part? –  samprat Dec 22 '10 at 16:30

Fix up your main code to look like this:

//In main
int main( int argc , char *argv[])
{ 
  char *letter = ReadToSerialPort();
  if(letter != NULL)
  {
   printf("Response is %s\n",letter);
  }
}

Make sure you use the buffer declared as static within ReadToSerialPort()..... i.e.:

static char buffer[256];
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This is the simplest and easiest way to ensure that the buffer will remain static to prevent garbage upon function going out of scope! –  t0mm13b Dec 22 '10 at 15:55
1  
But this will fail in the code like char *letter = ReadToSerialPort(); char *letter2 = ReadToSerialPort();, the second call will overwrite the result of the first. –  Vlad Dec 22 '10 at 15:57

You need to specify your function a bit more. You can not simply say it "returns a char *". Where are the characters it points to? In a static buffer? On the heap (allocated by new)? It looks like you are trying to return a pointer to a local buffer (allocated on the stack), which is an error. Alternatively, return a std::string.

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You should change the signature of ReadToSerialPort() to also inform the caller how many bytes you are returning. So you could do either this:

int ReadToSerialPort(char** data);

or this:

void ReadToSerialPort(char** data, int* num_of_bytes);

and you stay responsible for allocating memory space inside ReadToSerialPort().

The user would do something like (not tested):

int main( int argc , char *argv[])
{ 
  char* data = NULL;
  int count = 0;
  ReadToSerialPort(data, &count);
  if (data != NULL && count > 0) // Let's suppose count returns as 5
  {
    printf("data[0]:%x data[1]:%x data[2]:%x data[3]:%x data[4]:%x\n", data[0], data[1], data[2], data[3], data[4]);
  }

  // and the user is responsible for deallocating data himself
  free(data);

  return 0;
}
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