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I'm new to Objective C. I have basic knowledge in C, including the concept of pointers. I have two basic questions:

  1. Can someone explain the difference between assign,copy, and retain with some analogy?
  2. How do you handle a function which returns pointer variable, and how do you perform messaging through a return pointer?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Updated Answer for Changed Documentation

The information is now spread across several guides in the documentation. Here's a list of required reading:

The answer to this question now depends entirely on whether you're using an ARC-managed application (the modern default for new projects) or forcing manual memory management.

Assign vs. Weak - Use assign to set a property's pointer to the address of the object without retaining it or otherwise curating it; use weak to have the property point to nil automatically if the object assigned to it is deallocated. In most cases you'll want to use weak so you're not trying to access a deallocated object (illegal access of a memory address - "EXC_BAD_ACCESS") if you don't perform proper cleanup.

Retain vs. Copy - Declared properties use retain by default (so you can simply omit it altogether) and will manage the object's reference count automatically whether another object is assigned to the property or it's set to nil; Use copy to automatically send the newly-assigned object a -copy message (which will create a copy of the passed object and assign that copy to the property instead - useful (even required) in some situations where the assigned object might be modified after being set as a property of some other object (which would mean that modification/mutation would apply to the property as well).

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Thanks dude I read the basics from Apple Dev , on my present development Having a hard time in memory management "crashed in objc_msgSend()" So i just thought of revising my understanding on properties. stackoverflow.com/questions/4506205/… –  Anandh Dec 22 '10 at 16:14
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Just a heads up, the link into the answer goes to a generic "Page not found" on apples site. Then it redirects to the "Mac Developer Library" This SO answer has useful info: stackoverflow.com/questions/2255861/… –  hippee-lee Feb 4 '13 at 22:02
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Kind of a difficult one to update because the documentation has changed and it's no longer in one convenient place. Feedback sent to Apple doc team. –  Joshua Nozzi Mar 19 '14 at 17:36

The Memory Management Programming Guide from the iOS Reference Library has basics of assign, copy, and retain with analogies and examples.

copy Makes a copy of an object, and returns it with retain count of 1. If you copy an object, you own the copy. This applies to any method that contains the word copy where “copy” refers to the object being returned.

retain Increases the retain count of an object by 1. Takes ownership of an object.

release Decreases the retain count of an object by 1. Relinquishes ownership of an object.

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Thanks for your reply.Could you please explain 1.ClassA have a property called - (Class B*)functionName; 2.ClassB have method – (void)setHeight; 3.ClassC interface I have declared ClassA *tempA as retain. 4.Class C implementation in the constructor I have this statement ClassB *tempB = tempA.functionName; 5.When I try to send a message (tempB. setHeight;) on the next line of tempB initialization my program works fine. –  Anandh Dec 22 '10 at 16:41
    
6.putting the same statement(tempB. setHeight;) into some function and calling the same function my program get Crashed in objc_msgSend(). –  Anandh Dec 22 '10 at 16:41

· Assign is for primitive values like BOOL, NSInteger or double. For objects use retain or copy, depending on if you want to keep a reference to the original object or make a copy of it. · assign: In your setter method for the property, there is a simple assignment of your instance variable to the new value, eg:

-(void)setString:(NSString*)newString{
 string = newString; 
}

This can cause problems since Objective-C objects use reference counting, and therefore by not retaining the object, there is a chance that the string could be deallocated whilst you are still using it. · retain: this retains the new value in your setter method. For example: This is safer, since you explicitly state that you want to maintain a reference of the object, and you must release it before it will be deallocated.

(void)setString:(NSString*)newString{
     
        [newString retain];
     
          [string release];
       
 string = newString;
    
}

· copy: this makes a copy of the string in your setter method: This is often used with strings, since making a copy of the original object ensures that it is not changed whilst you are using it.

(void)setString:(NSString*)newString{
       
         if(string!=newString){
         
                        [string release];
         
                        string = [newString copy];
       
         }

    }
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