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I have two classes, CheckboxItemsList which extends a generic list, and CheckboxItems, which contains a list of objects of type CheckboxItem.

I want to use LINQ to be able to filter CheckboxItemsList based on properties of its CheckboxItems objects. The return type is always a generic list, though, but I want it to be a CheckboxItemsList.

So I guess the basic question is, can linq be made to return a list of the same type that it starts with? Since I can't cast a base class to a derived class, do I have any option other than iterating through the results of the linq query and rebuilding the derived list object row by row? Not that this is the end of the world, but I'm relatively new to linq and was wondering it there is a better way to do it.

What I want:

CheckboxItemsList newList = MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed);

(obviously doesn't work since the query will return List<CheckboxItems>, not CheckboxItemsList)

The objects, generally:

public class CheckboxItemsList: List<CheckboxItems>
{
   // does not add any fields, just access methods
}

public class CheckboxItems : IEnumerable<CheckboxItem>
{
    public long PrimaryKey=0;
    protected CheckboxItem[] InnerList;
    public bool Changed
    {
        get {
            return (InnerList.Any(item => item.Changed));
        }
    }
    ....
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, this is not possible out of the box. You'll need to add code to do this.

For example, you can add a constructor like so:

public CheckboxItemsList(IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> checkboxItems) {
    // something happens
}

Then you can say

CheckboxItemsList newList = new CheckboxItemsList(
    MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item => item.Changed)
);

Additionally, you could add an extension method like so

static class IEnumerableCheckboxItemsExtensions {
    public static ToCheckboxItemsList(
        this IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> checkboxItems
    ) {
        return new CheckboxItemsList(checkboxItems);
    }
}

and then

CheckboxItemsList newList =
    MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item => item.Changed)
                       .ToCheckboxItemsList();
share|improve this answer
    
OK, the first option is kind of what I was thinking. Seems odd that linq doesn't have a built-in way to return a list some other type that accepts the objects it returns, e.g. newlist = MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed).ToList(typeof(CheckboxItemsList)) –  Jamie Treworgy Dec 22 '10 at 16:06
    
@jamietre: No, it's not odd at all. Remember, every feature requires design, development, testing and maintenance and has costs associated with it including but not limited to opportunity costs. –  Jason Dec 22 '10 at 16:22
    
Well, true. Being new to linq I'm just figuring out what it can and can't do, and until now it seemed like it could do just about everything... –  Jamie Treworgy Dec 22 '10 at 16:36

LINQ works on IEnumerable<T> and IQueryable<T> and the result types of all LINQ operations (Where, Select) etc, will return one of those. The standard ToList function returns a concrete list of type List<T>, you may need to come up with an extension method, e.g.:

public static CheckboxItemsList ToItemList(this IEnumerable<CheckboxItem> enumerable)
{
  return new CheckboxItemsList(enumerable);
}
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You can also use "Conversion Operator", as below:

    public class CheckboxItemsList: List<CheckboxItems>
{


        public static implicit operator CheckboxItems(IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> items)             
        {
            var list = new CheckboxItemsList();
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                list.Add(item);
            }
            return list;
        }
}

Now, the below code would work.

CheckboxItemsList newList = MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed);

From MSDN:

A conversion operator declaration that includes the implicit keyword introduces a user-defined implicit conversion. Implicit conversions can occur in a variety of situations, including function member invocations, cast expressions, and assignments. This is described further in Section 6.1.

A conversion operator declaration that includes the explicit keyword introduces a user-defined explicit conversion. Explicit conversions can occur in cast expressions, and are described further in Section 6.2.

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That's pretty cool. Learn something new every day. –  Jamie Treworgy Dec 22 '10 at 16:27

No, there's no built-in way to do this. You have two main options:

  1. Add a constructor to your CheckboxItemsList class that takes an IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> or similar. Pass that collection on to the base List<T> constructor that takes an IEnumerable<T>. That base constructor should then populate the list for you:

    var newList =
        new CheckboxItemsList(MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed));
    // ...
    public class CheckboxItemsList : List<CheckboxItems>
    {
        public CheckboxItemsList(IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> collection)
            : base(collection)
        {
        }
    }
    
  2. Create an extension method that takes an IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> or similar and returns a populated CheckboxItemsList:

    var newList = MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed)
                                     .ToCheckboxItemsList();
    // ...
    public static class EnumerableExtensions
    {
        public static CheckboxItemsList ToCheckboxItemsList(
            this IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> source)
        {
            var list = new CheckboxItemsList();
            foreach (T item in source)
            {
                list.Add(item);
            }
            return list;
        }
    }
    

(Of course, for completeness you could implement both of these options. The extension method would then just pass its IEnumerable<CheckboxItems> argument on to the constructor rather than manually looping and adding each item.)

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Here is what I came up with, building on the various suggestions of others. A generic extension method:

public static T ToList<T>(this IEnumerable baseList) where T : IList,new()
{
    T newList = new T();
    foreach (object obj in baseList)
    {
        newList.Add(obj);
    }
    return (newList);
}

So now I can do what I want:

CheckboxItemsList newList = MyCheckboxItemsList.Where(item=>item.Changed)
     .ToList<CheckboxItemsList>();

Another pretty obvious solution occurred to me, which is also useful for situations where the derived list class has field properties that I need to maintain in the new list.

Just create a new instance of my derived list class, and use AddRange to populate it.

// When created with a CheckboxItemsList parameter, it creates a new empty 
// list but copies fields
CheckboxItemsList newList = new CheckboxItemsList(OriginalList);
newList.AddRange(OriginalList.Where(item => item.Changed));
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