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Let's say I have a container class called MyContainerClass that holds integers. The [] operator, as you know, can be overloaded so the user can more intuitively access values as if the container were a regular array. For example:

MyContainerClass MyInstance;
// ...
int ValueAtIndex = MyInstance[3]; // Gets the value at the index of 3.

The obvious return type for operator[] would be int, but then the user wouldn't be able to do something like this:

MyContainerClass MyInstance;
MyInstance[3] = 5;

So, what should the return type for operator[] be?

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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The obvious return type is int& :)

For increased elaboration:

int &operator[](ptrdiff_t i) { return myarray[i]; }

int const& operator[](ptrdiff_t i) const { return myarray[i]; }
// ^ could be "int" too. Doesn't matter for a simple type as "int".
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Yes, with both const and non-const overloads. –  Fred Larson Dec 22 '10 at 16:03
    
BTW, why ptrdiff_t rather than size_t? –  UncleBens Dec 22 '10 at 16:13
    
@UncleBens i prefer ptrdiff_t because that's what real arrays's op[] use too when they occur in overload scenarios. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 16:24
1  
<Nit Pick>Why is the & bound to the operator of the first and bound to the type on the second</Nit Pick> –  Loki Astari Dec 22 '10 at 19:26
1  
@Martin it's some weird scheme i'm using. if i have "T", i tend to put the '&' on the name. If it's "T cv" i tend to put the '&' on the type :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 19:32
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This should be a reference:

int &
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Usually you want to add a const overload for it too –  Flexo Dec 22 '10 at 16:03
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class MyContainerClass {
public:
  int& operator[](unsigned int index);
  int operator[](unsigned int index) const;
  // ...
};

Returning a reference lets the user use the result as an lvalue, as in your example MyInstance[3] = 5;. Adding a const overload makes sure they can't do that if MyInstance is a const variable or reference.

But sometimes you want things to look like that but don't really have an int you can take a reference to. Or maybe you want to allow multiple types on the right-hand side of MyInstance[3] = expr;. In this case, you can use a dummy object which overloads assignment:

class MyContainerClass {
private:
  class Index {
  public:
    Index& operator=(int val);
    Index& operator=(const string& val);
  private:
    Index(MyContainerClass& cont, unsigned int ind);
    MyContainerClass& m_cont;
    unsigned int m_ind;
    friend class MyContainerClass;
  };
public:
  Index operator[](unsigned int ind) { return Index(*this, ind); }
  int operator[](unsigned int ind) const;
// ...
};
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int&

returning a reference allows you too use the returned value as a left-hand side of the assignment.

same reason why operator<<() returns an ostream&, which allows you to write cout << a << b;

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