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Take a look at this basic class:

namespace AcmeWeb
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    public class Person 
    {
        public Person(string firstName, string lastName) 
        {
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(firstName))
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException(firstName);
            }

            this.FirstName = firstName;
        }
    }
}

What's the best translation of this into JavaScript?

This is what I'm thinking:

(function(namespace) {

    namespace.Person = function(firstName, lastName) {

        // Constructor

        (function() {
            if (!firstName) {
                throw "'firstName' argument cannot be null or empty";
            }
        })();

        // Private memberts

        var _ = {
            firstName: firstName
        };

        // Public members

        this.firstName = function(value) {
            if (typeof(value) === "undefined") {
                return _.firstName;
            }
            else {
                _.firstName = value;
                return this;
            }
        };

    };

})(AcmeWeb);
share|improve this question
2  
First of all, why are converting it to JS? If its because you need that object on the Client you can parse your class into JSON and pass it to the client, then you will be able to treat the JSON object on the client exactly like your class on the server. –  Gary L Cox Jr Dec 22 '10 at 16:35
    
I'm just exploring making JavaScript more OO. –  AgileMeansDoAsLittleAsPossible Dec 22 '10 at 17:06
1  
There is something called Script# that is a compiler for C# to JavaScript: projects.nikhilk.net/ScriptSharp I've never tried this, but the idea sounds great to me. –  Uwe Keim Dec 22 '10 at 17:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use real getters/setters in javascript. See John Resig's post for more information. See the fiddle.

(function(NS) {
    NS.Person = function(firstName, lastName) {
        if (!firstName) {
            throw "'firstName' argument cannot be null or empty";
        }

        var FirstName = firstName;
        this.__defineGetter__("FirstName", function(){
            console.log('FirstName getter says ' + FirstName);
            return FirstName;
        });

        this.__defineSetter__("FirstName", function(val){
            console.log('FirstName setter says ' + val);
            FirstName = val;
        });
    }
})(AcmeWeb);

var p = new AcmeWeb.Person('John', 'Smith');
p.FirstName;          // => FirstName getter says John
p.FirstName = 'Joe';  // => FirstName setter says Joe
share|improve this answer
    
Sample usage please? –  Kirk Woll Dec 22 '10 at 17:13
    
@Kirk Woll - jsfiddle.net/jruddell/xhB7E. I only tested this out in Chrome. –  Josiah Ruddell Dec 22 '10 at 17:17
var AcmeWeb = {
    Person: function(firstName, lastName) {
        if (!firstName) {
            throw "'firstName' argument cannot be null or empty";
        }
        this.FirstName = firstName;
    }
};

Then you can new up a Person:

var person = new AcmeWeb.Person("john", "smith");
share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer because what good is a accessor/mutator really doing here in the JS code other than making so you have to call person.firstname() –  Josiah Ruddell Dec 22 '10 at 16:52

It should be like

(function(namespace) {
    namespace.Person = function(firstName, lastName) {
        var firstName    = firstName || 'default',
            lastName     = lastName || 'default',
            moarPrivates = 'foo';

        return {
            firstname: function(value) {
                if( value ) {
                    firstName = value;
                    return this;
                }
                else {
                    return firstName;
                }
            },
            lastname: function(value) {
                if( value ) {
                    lastName = value;
                    return this;
                }
                else {
                    return lastName;
                }
            }
        };
    };
}(AcmeWeb));

var Andy = AcmeWeb.Person('Andy', 'Foo');

Andy.firstname('Andreas').lastname('Baaaaar');
console.log('Hello, my name is ', Andy.firstname(), ' ', Andy.lastname());

By returning on object literal, all local variables from the constructor function are closured. That is why they are private and only accessible from within the Person object. The public methods are those which you enclose into the returning object literal.

Example: http://www.jsfiddle.net/GkFu4/1/

share|improve this answer
    
great answer!!!! –  Nikos Mar 5 '13 at 14:57

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