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I am a novice. My question is what is the "-" before the keys (type, expires name etc) standing for? Why not just use the plain hash table way and discard the hyphen?

# #!/usr/local/bin/perl -w
use CGI; 
$q = CGI->new; 
print $q->header(-type=>'image/gif',-expires=>'+3d');
$q->param(-name=>'veggie',-value=>'tomato');
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The author already explained in the documentation.

Most CGI.pm routines accept several arguments, sometimes as many as 20 optional ones! To simplify this interface, all routines use a named argument calling style that looks like this:

print $q->header(-type=>'image/gif',-expires=>'+3d');

Each argument name is preceded by a dash. Neither case nor order matters in the argument list. -type, -Type, and -TYPE are all acceptable. In fact, only the first argument needs to begin with a dash. If a dash is present in the first argument, CGI.pm assumes dashes for the subsequent ones.

Several routines are commonly called with just one argument. In the case of these routines you can provide the single argument without an argument name. header() happens to be one of these routines. In this case, the single argument is the document type.

print $q->header('text/html');

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Coooooooooooooool!!! Thanks. This solves my question! –  lkahtz Dec 22 '10 at 17:35

See perlop:

If the operand is an identifier, a string consisting of a minus sign concatenated with the identifier is returned. Otherwise, if the string starts with a plus or minus, a string starting with the opposite sign is returned. One effect of these rules is that -bareword is equivalent to the string "-bareword". (emphasis mine)

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This is coooool. Can we make it a bit more "English-ized"... Like -barewood eq "barewood" and +barewood eq what? –  lkahtz Dec 22 '10 at 17:16
    
In addition, thanks man!! –  lkahtz Dec 22 '10 at 17:17
    
Well well well! I thought this worked in CGI::pm because of the magic of =>. Apparently it doesn't because that only applies to \w characters. –  Colin Fine Dec 23 '10 at 12:54

This is just an older style of perl arguments that isn't usually used in newer modules. It's not exactly deprecated, it's just an older style based on how Perl allows you to not quote your hash keys if they start with a dash.

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1  
AFAIR the { bareword => "value" } notation has not been in perl forever, and was preceded by -barewords. That's why older modules use this form. I may be wrong though. –  Dallaylaen Dec 22 '10 at 21:06

I don't know what you mean by the 'plain hashtable way'. The way CGI::pm is implemented, names of properties are (in most cases) required to be preceded by '-', presumably so that they can be identified.

Or to put it another way, the hash-key required by CGI::header to identify the 'type' property is '-type'.

That's just the way CGI.pm is defined.

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Then what about the self-customized parameters to CGI::new, like: $query = CGI->new( {'dinosaur'=>'barney', 'song'=>'I love you', 'friends'=>[qw/Jessica George Nancy/]} ); –  lkahtz Dec 22 '10 at 17:05
    
Can I understand this way? "Hyphened" keys are standard tags for HTML. Customized keys can be.... without hyphens? –  lkahtz Dec 22 '10 at 17:07
    
OK, I oversimplified (though I did say "in most cases"). The perldoc says "Each argument name is preceded by a dash. Neither case nor order matters in the argument list. -type, -Type, and -TYPE are all acceptable. In fact, only the first argument needs to begin with a dash. If a dash is present in the first argument, CGI.pm assumes dashes for the subsequent ones." –  Colin Fine Dec 23 '10 at 12:42
    
The perldoc gives your example for CGI::new without explaining it. My conclusion is that 'new' behaves differently from other methods: for methods other than HTML shortcuts, if the first argument does not begin with '-' it will be taken as the value for the first-defined property, usually the name. –  Colin Fine Dec 23 '10 at 12:47
    
But the distinction you are making between standard and customized keys is wrong. The perldoc says "Many routines will do something useful with a named argument that it doesn't recognize. For example, you can produce non-standard HTTP header fields by providing them as named arguments:" and the following examples uses the '-'. –  Colin Fine Dec 23 '10 at 12:49

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