Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thought I understood @property and @synthesize, but I did some experimenting and I can't figure out why the below (what I thought was broken) code works.

As you can see, there's no instance variable that corresponds to the name property. Does Objective-C somehow create an instance variable if it doesn't find an instance variable with the same name and type?

Header:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface AddressCard : NSObject {

}

@property (copy, nonatomic) NSString *name;
-(void) print;

@end

Implementation:

#import "AddressCard.h"

@implementation AddressCard

@synthesize name;

-(void) print {
    NSLog(@"Name=%@", self.name);
}

-(void) dealloc {
    [name release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@end

Test:

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    AddressCard *ac = [[AddressCard alloc] init];
    ac.name = @"Brandon";
    [ac print];

    [ac release];

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

The quick answer is: "yes". In Objective-C 2.0, synthesized properties will automatically create the corresponding ivars as required.

Apple's documentation has some more details.

Important: As pointed out by Tommy (note: this is from the legacy docs - please see the latest information):

In Objective-C 2.0 on either of the modern runtimes (ie, Intel 64bit and ARM) properties can be added to classes 'dynamically' (that is, at runtime but only before the creation of any instances — not particularly dynamic compared to the rest of the runtime). However, this can't be done on either of the two older runtimes (ie, Intel 32bit and PowerPC). It's therefore not really something you want to use on shipping software for the Mac or during development for iOS (since the simulator is a 32bit Intel application and can't create instance variables at runtime)

share|improve this answer
    
@e.James I did not know that. Learn something new every day. –  Jacob Relkin Dec 22 '10 at 17:18
4  
This isn't quite true. In Objective-C 2.0 on either of the modern runtimes (ie, Intel 64bit and ARM) properties can be added to classes 'dynamically' (that is, at runtime but only before the creation of any instances — not particularly dynamic compared to the rest of the runtime). However, this can't be done on either of the two older runtimes (ie, Intel 32bit and PowerPC). It's therefore not really something you want to use on shipping software for the Mac or during development for iOS (since the simulator is a 32bit Intel application and can't create instance variables at runtime). –  Tommy Dec 22 '10 at 17:20
6  
@Tommy: It actually works correctly on the iOS Simulator. :) –  Jonathan Grynspan Dec 22 '10 at 17:21
    
@Tommy: Thanks for the heads-up. I placed your comment right in the answer to make sure it gets noticed –  e.James Dec 22 '10 at 17:24
1  
Link in answer no longer works. Apple rearranged their docs. Let's hope these last a while. See "Runtime Difference" section at bottom of Declared Properties‌​. Also, Runtime Version and Platforms. –  Jeff Apr 29 '12 at 2:38

You can omit instance variable declaration only for 64-bit architecture

share|improve this answer
    
This also works on iOS –  Joshua Weinberg Dec 22 '10 at 17:22

I want to add that although the instance variable is automatically created, it's named the same as the property. By doing this, you may get bugs in your code later. So, besides preventing the case of not automatically generating on some architectures, you should always create the instance variable so that you don't get anything unexpected later on down the road.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.