Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to generate queries similar to the like, contains, startswith operators with app engine BigTable database?

So that I could do something similar to:

db(db.some_table.like('someting')).select()

with app engine in web2py.

share|improve this question
    
Starts with is covered at stackoverflow.com/questions/1554600/… ; the other 2 aren't possible. –  Wooble Dec 22 '10 at 19:34
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

App engine does not support full text search so short answer is no.

What you can do with web2py is create a computed filed with a list of keywords to search for.

 def tokenize(r): return [x.lower() for x in re.compile('\w+').findall(r.title)]

 db.define_table('data',
    Field('title'),
    Field('keywords','list:string',compute=tokenize,writable=False,readable=False))

On GAE the keywords field is a StringListProperty().

Then instead of searching in title, you search in keywords:

 rows = db(db.data.keywords.contains(my_keyword.lower())).select()

This works on GAE and it is very efficient. The problem now is that you will not be used to combine it in complex queries because of the GAE "exploding" indexes problem. For example is you have N keywords and want to search for two keywords:

 rows = db(db.data.keywords.contains(my_keyword1.lower())&
           db.data.keywords.contains(my_keyword2.lower())).select()

Your index size becomes N^2. So you have to perform more complex queries locally:

 query2=lambda r: my_keyword1.lower() in r.keywords
 rows = db(db.data.keywords.contains(my_keyword1.lower())).select().find(query2)

All of this will also work on GAE and not-on-GAE. It is portable.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! great answer –  crodjer Dec 23 '10 at 4:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.