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Very often I want to convert a list wherein each index has identical element types to a data frame. For example, I may have a list:

> my.list
[[1]]
[[1]]$global_stdev_ppb
[1] 24267673

[[1]]$range
[1] 0.03114799

[[1]]$tok
[1] "hello"

[[1]]$global_freq_ppb
[1] 211592.6


[[2]]
[[2]]$global_stdev_ppb
[1] 11561448

[[2]]$range
[1] 0.08870838

[[2]]$tok
[1] "world"

[[2]]$global_freq_ppb
[1] 1002043

I want to convert this list to a data frame where each index element is a column. The natural (to me) thing to go is to is use do.call:

> my.matrix<-do.call("rbind", my.list)
> my.matrix
     global_stdev_ppb range      tok     global_freq_ppb
[1,] 24267673         0.03114799 "hello" 211592.6       
[2,] 11561448         0.08870838 "world" 1002043

Straightforward enough, but when I attempt to cast this matrix as a data frame, the columns remain list elements, rather than vectors:

> my.df<-as.data.frame(my.matrix, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
> my.df[,1]
[[1]]
[1] 24267673

[[2]]
[1] 11561448

Currently, to get the data frame cast properly I am iterating over each column using unlist and as.vector, then recasting the data frame as such:

new.list<-lapply(1:ncol(my.matrix), function(x) as.vector(unlist(my.matrix[,x])))
my.df<-as.data.frame(do.call(cbind, new.list), stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

This, however, seem very inefficient. Is there are better way to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I think you want:

> do.call(rbind, lapply(my.list, data.frame, stringsAsFactors=FALSE))
  global_stdev_ppb      range   tok global_freq_ppb
1         24267673 0.03114799 hello        211592.6
2         11561448 0.08870838 world       1002043.0
> str(do.call(rbind, lapply(my.list, data.frame, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)))
'data.frame':   2 obs. of  4 variables:
 $ global_stdev_ppb: num  24267673 11561448
 $ range           : num  0.0311 0.0887
 $ tok             : chr  "hello" "world"
 $ global_freq_ppb : num  211593 1002043
share|improve this answer
    
you beat me by about 15 seconds you speed demon. –  JD Long Dec 22 '10 at 18:49
    
@JD Long zoom zoom. I gave you +1 for your awesomely late answer. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 22 '10 at 18:50
    
I gave you +1 for beating me. it's like the mutual admiration society in here. –  JD Long Dec 22 '10 at 18:56
    
You're both awesome, thanks! –  DrewConway Dec 22 '10 at 19:12
5  
plyr::rbind.fill is often a little faster than rbind.fill, and the whole operation is equivalent to plyr::ldply(my.list, data.frame) –  hadley Dec 23 '10 at 0:54

Another option is:

data.frame(t(sapply(mylist, `[`)))

but this simple manipulation results in a data frame of lists:

> str(data.frame(t(sapply(mylist, `[`))))
'data.frame':   2 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ a:List of 2
  ..$ : num 1
  ..$ : num 2
 $ b:List of 2
  ..$ : num 2
  ..$ : num 3
 $ c:List of 2
  ..$ : chr "a"
  ..$ : chr "b"

An alternative to this, along the same lines but now the result same as the other solutions, is:

data.frame(lapply(data.frame(t(sapply(mylist, `[`))), unlist))

[Edit: included timings of @Martin Morgan's two solutions, which have the edge over the other solution that return a data frame of vectors.] Some representative timings on a very simple problem:

mylist <- list(list(a = 1, b = 2, c = "a"), list(a = 2, b = 3, c = "b"))

> ## @Joshua Ulrich's solution:
> system.time(replicate(1000, do.call(rbind, lapply(mylist, data.frame,
+                                     stringsAsFactors=FALSE))))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.740   0.001   1.750

> ## @JD Long's solution:
> system.time(replicate(1000, do.call(rbind, lapply(mylist, data.frame))))
   user  system elapsed 
  2.308   0.002   2.339

> ## my sapply solution No.1:
> system.time(replicate(1000, data.frame(t(sapply(mylist, `[`)))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.296   0.000   0.301

> ## my sapply solution No.2:
> system.time(replicate(1000, data.frame(lapply(data.frame(t(sapply(mylist, `[`))), 
+                                               unlist))))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.067   0.001   1.091

> ## @Martin Morgan's Map() sapply() solution:
> f = function(x) function(i) sapply(x, `[[`, i)
> system.time(replicate(1000, as.data.frame(Map(f(mylist), names(mylist[[1]])))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.775   0.000   0.778

> ## @Martin Morgan's Map() lapply() unlist() solution:
> f = function(x) function(i) unlist(lapply(x, `[[`, i), use.names=FALSE)
> system.time(replicate(1000, as.data.frame(Map(f(mylist), names(mylist[[1]])))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.653   0.000   0.658
share|improve this answer
1  
Show off! Mine's prettier. :P –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 22 '10 at 20:26
2  
my number is the biggest! I WIN!!!! –  JD Long Dec 22 '10 at 20:32
    
@Joshua; mine wins the inelegant badge :P –  Gavin Simpson Dec 22 '10 at 22:04
    
Hrm.. the replicate() usage in this answer is a bit weird. You're testing how efficient it is to convert a small list to a data frame lots of times. That seems like it would only rarely be useful. Wouldn't it make more sense to test the efficiency of the conversion of a large list of lists? –  naught101 Jul 8 at 2:22
    
@naught101 possibly; you have the code, try it out ;-) (Report back findings --- you can edit them into my Answer if you like) –  Gavin Simpson Jul 12 at 16:34

I can't tell you this is the "most efficient" in terms of memory or speed, but it's pretty efficient in terms of coding:

my.df <- do.call("rbind", lapply(my.list, data.frame))

the lapply() step with data.frame() turns each list item into a single row data frame which then acts nice with rbind()

share|improve this answer

This

f = function(x) function(i) sapply(x, `[[`, i)

is a function that returns a function that extracts the i'th element of x. So

Map(f(mylist), names(mylist[[1]]))

gets a named (thanks Map!) list of vectors that can be made into a data frame

as.data.frame(Map(f(mylist), names(mylist[[1]])))

For speed it's usually faster to use unlist(lapply(...), use.names=FALSE) as

f = function(x) function(i) unlist(lapply(x, `[[`, i), use.names=FALSE)

A more general variant is

f = function(X, FUN) function(...) sapply(X, FUN, ...)

When do the list-of-lists structures come up? Maybe there's an earlier step where an iteration could be replaced by something more vectorized?

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the illustration of Map. I need to incorporate Map, Reduce et. al into my every-day routines... –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 22 '10 at 22:45
    
How does one use these things? The as.data.frame(Map(f(mylist), names(mylist))) version doesn't work for me for the sorts of data @DrewConway and I used as the lists don't have names; I get this returned instead data frame with 0 columns and 0 rows. Even with names, I can't get this to work for mylist in my answer. I'm genuinely curious as I haven't used Map et al at all, so am interested in how they work, what they do, when best to deploy etc. –  Gavin Simpson Dec 22 '10 at 23:23
    
Oops, should have been names(mylist[[1]]), i.e., get the names of the sub-elements from the first element. –  Martin Morgan Dec 22 '10 at 23:32
    
+1 That's very nice @Martin –  Gavin Simpson Dec 23 '10 at 10:41
    
And the fastest solutions thus far (added some timings to my answer for comparison). –  Gavin Simpson Dec 23 '10 at 10:49

Although this question has long since been answered, it's worth pointing out the data.table package has rbindlist which accomplishes this task very quickly:

library(microbenchmark)
library(data.table)
l <- replicate(1E4, list(a=runif(1), b=runif(1), c=runif(1)), simplify=FALSE)

microbenchmark( times=5,
  R=as.data.frame(Map(f(l), names(l[[1]]))),
  dt=data.frame(rbindlist(l))
)

gives me

Unit: milliseconds
 expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
    R 31.060119 31.403943 32.278537 32.370004 33.932700     5
   dt  2.271059  2.273157  2.600976  2.635001  2.729421     5
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