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I have a table which has records that contain a persons information and a filename that the information originated from, so the table looks like so:

|Table|
|id, first-name, last-name, ssn, filename|

I also have a stored procedure that provides some analytics for the files in the system and i'm trying to add information to that stored procedure to shed light into the possibility of duplicates.

Here is the current stored procedure

SELECT [filename],
       COUNT([filename]) as totalRecords,
       COUNT(closedleads.id) as closedRecords,
       ROUND(--calcs percent of records closed in a file)
FROM table
LEFT OUTER JOIN closedleads ON closedleads.leadid = table.id
GROUP BY [filename]

What I want to add is the ability to see maybe # of possible duplicates, defined as records with matching SSNs and I am at a loss as to how I could perform a count on a sub query or join and include it in the results set. Can anyone provide some pointers?

What I'm trying to do is add something like this to my procedure above

SELECT COUNT(
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table T1
    INNER JOIN Table T2 on T1.SSN = T2.SSN
    WHERE T1.id != T2.id
) as PossibleDuplicates

What I'm looking for is merging this code with my procedure above so I can get all of the same data in one and possible have this # of duplicates across each filename, so for each filename I get a result of # of records, # of records closed and # of possible duplicates

EDIT:

I'm very close to my desired goal but I'm failing on the last little bit--getting the number of possible duplicates BY filename, here is my query

select [q1].[filename], [q1].leads, [q1].closed, [q2].dups
FROM (
    SELECT [filename], count([filename]) as leads,
    count(closedleads.id) as closed
    FROM Table
    left join closedleads on closedleads.leadid = Table.id
    group by [filename]
) as [q1]
INNER JOIN (
    select count([ssn]) as dups, [filename] from Table
    group by [ssn], [filename]
    having count([ssn]) > 1
) as [q2] on [q1].[filename] = [q2].[filename]

This works but it showing multiple results for each filename with values of 2-5 instead of summing the total count of possible duplicates

Working Query

Hey everyone, thanks for all the help, this is eventually what I got to that worked exactly as I wanted

select [q1].[filename], [q1].leads, [q1].closed, [q2].dups,
        round(([q1].closed / [q1].leads), 3) as percentClosed
FROM (
    SELECT [filename], count([filename]) as leads,
    count(closedleads.id) as closed
    FROM Table
    left join closedleads on closedleads.leadid = Table.id
    and [filename] is not null
    group by [filename]
) as [q1]
INNER JOIN (
    select [filename], count(*) - count(distinct [ssn]) as dups 
            from Table
            group by [filename]
) as [q2] on [q1].[filename] = [q2].[filename]
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think the existing answers don't quite understand your question. I think I do but it's not completely specified yet. Is it a duplicate if the same SSN appears in two different files or only within the same file? Because you group by filename, that becomes the grain.

The Output of your query is like

StateFarm1, 500,   50,    10%,   <your new value goes here>
AllState2,  100,   90,    90%    <your new value goes here>

So if you have the same SSN in those two files, you have 1 duplicate, so on which row do you show 1, on the AllState row or the Statefarm row? If you say both, invariably someone will SUM that column and get a doubling of the results.

Now What if you have a Geico row with the same SSN, is that 1 duplicate or 2? and again which row?

I know this isn't a final answer but these questions do highlight the the question as it stands is unanswerable... you fix this and I'll change the answer,

please no downvotes in the meantime

Addendum

I believe the only thing you are missing is a DISTINCT.

select [q1].[filename], [q1].leads, [q1].closed, [q2].dups
FROM (
    SELECT [filename], count([filename]) as leads,
    count(closedleads.id) as closed
    FROM tbldata
    left join closedleads on closedleads.leadid = Table.id
    group by [filename]
) as [q1]
INNER JOIN (
    select count( DISTINCT [ssn]) as dups, [filename] from Table '<---- here'
    group by [ssn], [filename]
    having count([ssn]) > 1
) as [q2] on [q1].[filename] = [q2].[filename]
share|improve this answer
    
You could do a COUNT(DISTINCT filename) and divide. then in the first case you'd have .5 dupes on the row with SF and .5 on AS or in the 2nd example .33 on each of SF, AS & geico. That way they would sum. –  Stephanie Page Dec 22 '10 at 19:30
    
You're on the right track understanding the question, also I had not thought about duplicates outside of a single file, I would like to see them based on the file itself then –  Jimmy Dec 22 '10 at 19:34
    
I added an update with an almost working example –  Jimmy Dec 22 '10 at 21:02
    
Maybe your business rules (i.e. how the files are created) couldn't have dupes between files and that's why you never considered it, but we don't know that. –  Stephanie Page Dec 22 '10 at 21:39
    
I think dups will exist between files but that is the lesser of my worries, also adding distinct on the ssn to the inner joined query still returns multiple results for each filename –  Jimmy Dec 27 '10 at 13:58

You'll probably want to make use of a HAVING clause somewhere, eg:

    LEFT JOIN (
        SELECT SSN, COUNT(SSN) - 1 DupeCount FROM Table T1
        GROUP BY SSN
        HAVING COUNT(SSN) > 1 ) AS PossibleDuplicates
    ON table.ssn = PossibleDuplicates.SSN

If you want to include 0 possible duplicates (rather than null) you actually don't need the HAVING clause, just the left join.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I add that to my current stored procedure to get both sets of results together? –  Jimmy Dec 22 '10 at 19:00
    
Added as a LEFT JOIN to my answer. I wasn't completely clear what you're looking for though, just number of possible duplicates? –  Kevin Stricker Dec 22 '10 at 19:02
    
If you had three records with the same SSN this query will report the DupeCount as two. You shouldn't be subtracting one from Count(SSN) –  JoshBerke Dec 22 '10 at 19:10
1  
@JoshBerke - That is by design. If I'm looking at a row with an SSN, and there is another row somewhere else with the same SSN, there is one duplicate of the row I'm looking at, not two. If there are 3, there are two duplicates, and if there is a single row, 0 duplicates. –  Kevin Stricker Dec 22 '10 at 19:13
    
ohh ok so in case of three records 1 is real and 2 are duplicates. Got yea –  JoshBerke Dec 22 '10 at 19:14

Edit - Updated with a better example which matches your question better

Here's an example if I understand correctly.

create table #table  (id int,ssn varchar(10))

insert into #table values(1,'10')
insert into #table values(2,'10')

insert into #table values(3,'11')
insert into #table values(4,'12')


insert into #table values(5,'11')

insert into #table values(6,'13')


select sum(cnt)
from (
select count(distinct ssn) as cnt
from #table
group by ssn 
having count(*)>1
) dups

You shouldn't need to self join the table if you group by ssn and then pull back only ssn's where you have more then one.

share|improve this answer
1  
ok, didn't complete read this answer. It's close but the real questionis combining it with the rest of the query. Without filename in this query, you're granularity is different than his and can't be joined. See my answer (of more questions below) –  Stephanie Page Dec 22 '10 at 19:28
    
Check updates for something that is close to what I want but I'm doing something wrong –  Jimmy Dec 22 '10 at 21:08

You don't need the outer COUNT - your inner SELECT COUNT(*)... will return you just one number, a count of records with duplicate SSN but different id.

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