Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to learn Haskell and want to write a small program which prints the content of a file to the screen. When I load it into GHCi I get the following error:

The last statement in a 'do' construct must be an expression

I know this question has be asked already here: Haskell — “The last statement in a 'do' construct must be an expression”.

Even though my code is very similar I still can't figure out the problem. If anyone could point out the problem to me I'd be very thankful.

module Main (main) where

import System.IO
import System(getArgs)

main :: IO()
main = do
    args <- getArgs
    inh <- openFile $ ReadMode head args
    printFile inh
    hClose inh

printFile :: Handle -> IO ()
printFile handle = do
    end <- hIsEOF handle
        if end
            then return ()
            else do line <- hGetLine handle
                putStrLn line
                printFile handle
share|improve this question
    
Well, have you checked if your indentation is broken (i.e. you have both tabs and spaces)? –  delnan Dec 22 '10 at 20:35
    
@delnan: I did. I even changed it from tabs to spaces. –  Anonymous Coward Dec 22 '10 at 20:38
    
@delnan: It's line 15:4: 'end <- hIsEOF handle' –  Anonymous Coward Dec 22 '10 at 20:41
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your indentation is broken. These are better:

printFile :: Handle -> IO ()
printFile handle = do
    end <- hIsEOF handle
    if end
        then return ()
        else do line <- hGetLine handle
                putStrLn line
                printFile handle

printFile :: Handle -> IO ()
printFile handle = do
    end <- hIsEOF handle
    if end
        then return ()
        else do
            line <- hGetLine handle
            putStrLn line
            printFile handle

By having if further indented than end <- hIsEof handle, it was actually a line continuation, not a subsequent action in the do. Similarly, the fact that you had putStrLn line less indented than line <- hGetLine handle means that the do (inside the else) ended there.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You wrote this:

main :: IO()
main = do
    args <- getArgs
    inh <- openFile $ ReadMode head args
    printFile inh
    hClose inh

But it is probably nicer like this:

main :: IO()
main = do
    args <- getArgs
    withFile (head args) ReadMode printFile
share|improve this answer
    
Even printFile could be shortened to printFile handle = do end <- hIsEof handle; unless end $ hGetLine handle >>= putStrLn >> printFile handle. –  ephemient Dec 23 '10 at 15:07
add comment

There are seveal issues. First, the if is indented too far - end <- ... is assumed to be the last line of the do. Unindent...

next issue comes up. Same error message, only at line 18. This time, line 19 and 20 are not indented deeply enough (they aren't parsed as part of the do). Indent (looks nicer anyway, since it all lines up now)... next error message. The good news is, it's not an indentation error this time and the fix is again trivial.

test.hs:9:22:
    Couldn't match expected type `([a] -> a) -> [String] -> FilePath'
           against inferred type `IOMode'
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `ReadMode head args'
    In a stmt of a 'do' expression:
        inh <- openFile $ ReadMode head args
    In the expression:
        do { args <- getArgs;
             inh <- openFile $ ReadMode head args;
             printFile inh;
             hClose inh }

The fix is inh <- openFile (head args) ReadMode. If you want a more detailed explanation of why/how your version is incorrect, or what the error means, let me know and I'll edit.

share|improve this answer
    
I missed that openFile bit when skimming. Seems like you actually plugged it into a compiler :) –  ephemient Dec 22 '10 at 21:07
    
Thanks for your help. I think I need to read up on that dollar sign. –  Anonymous Coward Dec 22 '10 at 21:17
1  
@Anonymous: It's nothing fancy, in fact it's boringly trivial :) f $ x = f x. It's only useful because it has very low priority, so it can replace parens in some situations (i.e. return $ Foo 1 "bar" instead of return (Foo 1 "bar")). –  delnan Dec 22 '10 at 21:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.