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Having a strong C++ background, I wonder how this works in Actionscript :

class A {

    public function callme():void {
    }

    public function foo():void {
        var a:Function = callme;
        a();
    }
}

The question is : does Actionscript "secretly" pass an object pointer alongside the function pointer?

Here is another question : is it possible to do something like this (pseudocode) :

class A {

    public function callme():void {
    }

    public function foo():void {
        var a:Function = callme;
        var classAinstance:A = new A();
        classAinstance.a();
    }
}

i.e have separate function and object pointers.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, Flash does pass the object context along with the function pointer. This hasn't always been the case, but is true as of ActionScript 3.0. See here:

http://www.adobe.com/devnet/actionscript/articles/actionscript3_overview.html

Method closures

Event handling is simplified in ActionScript 3.0 thanks to method closures, which provide built-in event delegation. In ActionScript 2.0, a closure would not remember what object instance it was extracted from, leading to unexpected behavior when the closure was invoked. The mx.utils.Delegate class was a popular workaround; to use it, you would write code as follows:

myButton.addEventListener("click", Delegate.create(this, someMethod));

This class is no longer needed because in ActionScript 3.0, a method closure will be generated when someMethod is referenced. The method closure will automatically remember its original object instance. Now, one can simply write:

myButton.addEventListener("click", someMethod);

As far as your second question, if you want to run a method in the context of a different object, then use .call() or .apply().

a.call(classA);

http://help.adobe.com/en_US/FlashPlatform/reference/actionscript/3/Function.html?filter_coldfusion=9&filter_flex=3&filter_flashplayer=10&filter_air=1.5

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1  
function.call(object) ? Hell of a syntax! – Bill Kotsias Dec 22 '10 at 21:31
    
@Bill Kotsias, everything is an object, and a function is an object, so why can't a function itself have functions? :-) – Samuel Neff Dec 22 '10 at 21:37

please try to ask one question at a time.

ActionScript doesn't use pointers per se. When you pass an object's function you're passing the function in the context of that object. The function will still reference the object it came from.

You'd really need to ask the ActionScript developers what actually happens behind the scenes, but I'm sure you'd get an answer along the lines of "we're under a non-disclosure agreement"

As far as your pseudocode is concerned, I think you meant to write classA.a();

as the A class you've defined has neither a property nor a function a that is publicly visible, calling classA.a(); wont work.

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