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I'm tempted to say this problem is with my general architecture but either way it's probably easier to show as an example than it would be to describe.

public class AppUserBase
{
}

public class AppUserAbc : AppUserBase
{
}

public class ManagerBase<T> where T : AppUserBase
{
    protected AppUserCollection<T> _users = new AppUserCollection<T>();
}

public class ManagerAbc : ManagerBase<AppUserAbc>
{

}

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        ManagerAbc x = new ManagerAbc();
        DoSomething(x); //fails
    }

    public static void DoSomething<M,U>(ManagerBase<AppUserBase> manager) where M : ManagerBase<U> where U : AppUserBase
    {
        //do something!
    }
}

I hope what I'm trying to do is easy to see and what I should be doing is even easier to explain to me :-).

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How does it fail? –  Tom Bushell Dec 22 '10 at 21:39
    
This code doesn't even compile. There is no Manager<> class in your code. And what is the error it gives you? Is it compile-time or run-time? We need more information, Chris. –  Amy Dec 22 '10 at 21:40
    
Also, C# 3.0 or 4.0? 4.0 has better co-variance / contra-variance support, which may be a factor here. –  Tom Bushell Dec 22 '10 at 21:42
    
Sorry, it was meant to be ManagerBase not Manager. I have modified the post. Also, C# 4.0 –  Chris Dec 22 '10 at 21:45
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's because you have two type parameters but only one is in the method signature, so it can't infer both. The other is not needed. Change your method signature to:

public static void DoSomething<U>(ManagerBase<U> manager)
    where U : AppUserBase
{
    //do something!
}
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you're right :) +1 –  Tomas Jansson Dec 22 '10 at 21:54
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That want work, as you probably know. The reason is that ManagerAbc is not of type ManagerBase<AppUserBase>. It doesn't help that the generic part is of the same type. You could try to change to:

public static void DoSomething<M,U>(ManagerBase<U> manager) where M : Manager<U> where U : AppUserBase
share|improve this answer
    
This does not compile. M is not in the method signature and thus cannot be inferred. –  Amy Dec 22 '10 at 21:46
    
@yoda: It won't compile if he call it like he does, but he can explicitly tell which types to use when making the call. However, M should be removed if it is not used, and it seems like it isn't in the example. –  Tomas Jansson Dec 22 '10 at 21:51
    
We are in agreement. (I wanted to say "yep", but the stupid character limit...) –  Amy Dec 22 '10 at 21:52
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