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Is it possible to inherit two base classes that have the same name, if the are in different namespaces?

By the way, I'm not planning at this time on doing this, but I was curious:

class SuperShape : Physics::Shape, Graphics::Shape
{
    // constructor
    SuperShape( int x, int y, float color) : ???( x, y ), ???( color );
}
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btw, you forgot to mention 'public' 'protected' or 'private' in the inheritance. –  snoofkin Dec 22 '10 at 22:16
3  
@soulSurfer2010: It's not necessary to indicate public, protected or private. In this case, it defaults to private since it is a class. For a struct, it defaults to public. Personally, I always explicitly state the access modifier, but the OP's code is valid C++ with respect to indicating base classes. –  In silico Dec 22 '10 at 22:17
    
Re: "Is it possible to inherit two base classes that have the same name, if the are in different namespaces?" The answer is YES, because they do have different names –  John Dibling Dec 22 '10 at 22:28
    
@JohnDibling yes, that was explained in @GregHewgill's answer below. –  user542687 Dec 22 '10 at 22:32
    
In fact by all of the answers, but Greg's is worded most clearly –  John Dibling Dec 22 '10 at 22:37

6 Answers 6

Well, simply :

SuperShape( int x, int y, float color)
    : Physics::Shape( x, y ), Graphics::Shape( color )
{
}
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Sure, why not? Nothing prevents you from doing so. Here is a working example:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <string>

namespace NS1 {

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass (const std::string &) {}
};

}

namespace NS2 {

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass (int) {}
};

}

class MyClass :
    public NS1::MyClass,
    public NS2::MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass () :
        NS1::MyClass (std::string ("Hello")),
        NS2::MyClass (1986)
    {}
};

int main ()
{
    MyClass clazz;
    std::cout << typeid (NS1::MyClass).name () << std::endl;
    std::cout << typeid (NS2::MyClass).name () << std::endl;
    std::cout << typeid (clazz).name () << std::endl;
}
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almost all were good answers, but this one was the most thorough. thanks everybody! –  user542687 Dec 22 '10 at 22:24

Classes in different namespaces actually do have different names (as far as C++ is concerned), even though the last part of the name (Shape in your example) might be the same. The name resolution is performed on the fully qualified name, including all namespaces.

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Yes. The constructor's mem-initializers will have to use qualified names.

SuperShape::SuperShape( int x, int y, float color )
    : Physics::Shape( x, y ), Graphics::Shape( color )
{ /*...*/ }
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Physics::Shape & Graphics::Shape respectively?

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Nobody mentioned that this is the only reason namespaces exist. :)

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3  
This is not the only reason namespaces exist. –  James McNellis Dec 22 '10 at 22:55

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