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When inheriting two base classes, what happens if both have a method with the same name and signature?

class Physics
{
public:
    void Update() { std::cout << "Physics!" }
};

class Graphics
{
public:
    void Update() { std::cout << "Graphics!" }
};

class Shape : Physics, Graphics
{
};

int main()
{
    Shape shape;
    shape.Update();
}

What will happen?

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2  
Why don't you try and see? –  Johan Kotlinski Dec 22 '10 at 23:15
    
Your trying to call an undefined function 'Update' in shape class which is inacessible in main. –  cpx Dec 22 '10 at 23:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well, first of all your code does not compile regardless of the call to Update :

  • The Update member functions lack returns types
  • Shape inherits privately from Physics and Graphics, so Update is inaccessible from main

Now, that being said, what happens when you attempt to call Update is an ambiguity which will lead to a compilation error. This ambiguity may be lifted using :

shape.Physics::Update();
shape.Graphics::Update();
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I agree that Shape inherits privately from Graphics and Physics. Why didn't g++ complain about that part? –  EnabrenTane Dec 22 '10 at 23:23
    
@EnabrenTane I never compiled it. This is all in theory. –  user542687 Dec 22 '10 at 23:27
    
makes sense. thanks! –  user542687 Dec 22 '10 at 23:29
    
@Jay I did compile a corrected example and posted the generated errors below. –  EnabrenTane Dec 22 '10 at 23:30

Found here https://gist.github.com/752273

$ g++ test.cpp 
    test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
    test.cpp:22: error: request for member ‘Update’ is ambiguous
    test.cpp:12: error: candidates are: void Graphics::Update()
    test.cpp:6: error:                 void Physics::Update()
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In this case, it should call Physics::Update because you specified that first when you defined the inheritance. Actually, in this case it won't work because it's not visible to you because you didn't specify public inheritance, but if you did, you should get Physics::Update by default. The best thing for you to do is to resolve the any ambiguity by writing Shape::Update and having that call Physics::Update and/or Graphics::Update as necessary.

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