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I plan to go with the free version in order to promote the paid version. Few questions:

  1. In your experience, is it helps?
  2. After a user has installed the free version, if he wants to install the paid version, he needs to remove the free version first ?
  3. how it effects downloads rates ?
  4. What is the correct way to do it?
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The link to your application above adds nothing of value to your question, and should be removed forthwith ... –  Stephen C Dec 23 '10 at 10:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

After some research for one of my applications, I have found the following options:

1 - Have all your code in one big library then make two applications using this shared library and have them toggle some flag saying the application is in trial or full mode.

To me, not very nice, because you'll need to handle the fact that the user can have both the free and full applications installed, when the users gets the full application, you'll need to move his data from the trial version to the full version (databases cannot be shared easily)

2 - Have one single application that can be unlocked by buying a code on a particular website

Good thing is you can provide alternate payment options (paypal, ...) and also avoid being limited to the Android Market. Can be nice when dealing with countries that don't have access to it.

3 - Have a single application with all the code plus one small unlock application to unlock the free application limitations

Good thing is you just need to update the free application and all users will get bug corrections. You also take advantage of the Android Market. Downside, is that your users need access to the market to get the full application.


I have personally chosen option 3 but I will add on top of it the option 2 because I intend to distribute my application on countries/devices that do not have access to Android Market

Edit 2/2/2011: I have published an article about that on our website. Your can read it there: http://www.marvinlabs.com/2011/01/sharing-code-full-lite-versions-application/

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Speaking as a user who can access the Market, I can say that option 2 feels less convenient than option 3 — apps which can be unlocked by buying the key in the Market feel more streamlined (and more secure, since I don’t have to manually manage the key). –  Josh Lee Dec 23 '10 at 16:56
    
I think that combination of 2 and 3 covers all you need to sell your app anywhere. –  MarvinLabs Dec 23 '10 at 17:26
    
Thank you, I think I choose based on your recommendation, option number three –  Chen M Dec 24 '10 at 6:16
    
Can you elaborate on how an application can unlock another application, please. What does the code? Thanks. –  rds Feb 4 '11 at 12:19
    
I have recently written an article about that: marvinlabs.com/2011/01/… –  MarvinLabs Feb 4 '11 at 14:53
  1. It's always a good idea to provide a demo (assuming there is incentive to buy the paid version, like a time trial, feature cripple, whatever is best to demonstrate the app without ruining the experience).

  2. Add two versions of your app to the market, one free, one paid.

  3. No, since they're two separate apps, but it would make sense to remove the free one in order to not have two apps installed.

  4. They're two separate apps, so they have two separate counts.

As an alternative, you could use a keyfile to unlock the features of the full version. If you do that, you should probably use Google Checkout for processing (all "fees" must go through Google's processing as per the TOS, IIRC). There's a lot more involved if you go this route (especially coming up with a keyfile system that cannot be easily hacked).

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