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We all know when using Collections.synchronizedXXX (e.g. synchronizedSet()) we get a synchonized "view" of the underlying collection.

However, the document of these wrapper generation methods states that we have to explitly synchronize on the collection when iterating of the collections using an iterator.

Which option do you choose to solve this problem?

I can only see the following approaches:

  1. do it as the documentation states: synchronize on the collection
  2. clone the collection before calling iterator()
  3. Use a collection which iterator is thread-safe (I am only aware of CopyOnWriteArrayList/Set)

And as a bonus question: when usign a synchronized view - is the use of foreach/Iterable thread-safe?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You've already answered your bonus question really: no, using an enhanced for loop isn't safe - because it uses an iterator.

As for which is the most appropriate approach - it really depends on how your context:

  • Are writes very infrequent? If so, CopyOnWriteArrayList may be most appropriate.
  • Is the collection reasonably small, and the iteration quick? (i.e. you're not doing much work in the loop) If so, synchronizing may well be fine - especially if this doesn't happen too often (i.e. you won't have much contention for the collection).
  • If you're doing a lot of work and don't want to block other threads working at the same time, the hit of cloning the collection may well be acceptable.
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Is it guaranteed that foreach will always take the use of an iterator() or is this implementation-specific? –  MRalwasser Dec 23 '10 at 10:25
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@MRalwasser: It's guaranteed by the spec, except for arrays which just use the array indexes. See section 14.14.2 of the JLS: java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/… –  Jon Skeet Dec 23 '10 at 10:32
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Depends on your access model. If you have low concurrency and frequent writes, 1 will have the best performance. If you have high concurrency with and infrequent writes, 3 will have the best performance. Option 2 is going to perform badly in almost all cases.

foreach calls iterator(), so exactly the same things apply.

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You could use one of the newer collections added in Java 5.0 which support concurrent access while iterating. Another approach is to take a copy using toArray which is thread safe (during the copy).

Collection<String> words = ...
// enhanced for loop over an array.
for(String word: words.toArray(new String[0])) {

}
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I might be totally off with your requirements, but if you are not aware of them, check out google-collections with "Favor immutability" in mind.

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I suggest dropping Collections.synchronizedXXX and handle all locking uniformly in the client code. The basic collections don't support the sort of compound operations useful in threaded code, and even if you use java.util.concurrent.* the code is more difficult. I suggest keeping as much code as possible thread-agnostic. Keep difficult and error-prone thread-safe (if we are very lucky) code to a minimum.

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It does depend on the result one needs to achieve cloning/copying/toArray(), new ArrayList(..) and the likes obtain a snapshot and does not lock the the collection. Using synchronized(collection) and iteration through ensure by the end of the iteration would be no modification, i.e. effectively locking it.

side note:(toArray() is usually preferred with some exceptions when internally it needs to create a temporary ArrayList). Also please note, anything but toArray() should be wrapped in synchronized(collection) as well, provided using Collections.synchronizedXXX.

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