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Recently came across an interesting feature, which, though, can result in a unexpected output of Eclipse "add unimplemented methods" feature. What is the "googl-able" name of the language concept behind this "occasional implicit implementation"?

I wouldn't expect the code below to compile but it did and is working

interface CallmeIfc {
  public void callme();
}

class CallmeCode {
  public void callme() {
    // implementation  
  }
}

class CallmeImpl extends CallmeCode implements CallmeIfc {
  // empty class body
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
  CallmeIfc me = (CallmeIfc) new CallmeImpl();
  me.callme(); // calls CallmeCode.callme()
}
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2  
Um... inheritance? Virtual function tables? –  OrangeDog Dec 23 '10 at 12:31
    
Your CallMeImpl implements public void callme() via inheriting it from CallMeCode. That's all, there's no special name for it. –  Joonas Pulakka Dec 23 '10 at 14:55
    
@Joonas Pulakka - I got the name for it, "subcontracting", Impl is exactly like an agency, serves a client(interface) by a contractor(super class) without letting them know each other :) –  bobah Dec 23 '10 at 15:29
    
@OrangeDog - yes, right, but havily misused –  bobah Dec 23 '10 at 15:36
    
@bobah - Not really, that's what it's designed to do. –  OrangeDog Dec 23 '10 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually this looks like a compiler bug to me: The Java Language Specification writes:

An instance method m1 declared in a class C overrides another instance method, m2, declared in class A iff all of the following are true:

  • C is a subclass of A.
  • The signature of m1 is a subsignature (§8.4.2) of the signature of m2.
  • Either
    • m2 is public, protected or declared with default access in the same package as C, or
    • m1 overrides a method m3, m3 distinct from m1, m3 distinct from m2, such that m3 overrides m2.

In your case, the first condition is not satisfied: The method callme is declared in class CallMeCode, which is not a subtype of CallmeIfc.

Edit: Bobah is right, the Spec distinguishes between implementing and overriding. In fact, it actually mandates the observed behaviour:

Unless the class being declared is abstract, the declarations of all the method members of each direct superinterface must be implemented either by a declaration in this class or by an existing method declaration inherited from the direct superclass, because a class that is not abstract is not permitted to have abstract methods

The Spec does not explain why.

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I am not entirely sure if a class implementing an interface is a "subclass" of that interface and the implementation of an interface method is "overriding". So what we observe can be a valid compiler behavior, a bit unusual though. –  bobah Dec 27 '10 at 0:08
    
You are right. I have edited accordingly. –  meriton Dec 27 '10 at 3:10

In CallmeImpl, the public callme() method is inherited from CallmeCode, so CallmeImpl respects the contract defined in the CallmeIfc.

Then, in your main() method, polymorphism allows you to assign a subclass instance (CallmeImpl) to a superclass or superinterface reference - in this particular case, the "me" reference, of type CallmeIfc (you have a typo here, BTW).

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Which part of my question have you answered? –  bobah Dec 23 '10 at 14:40
3  
Well, I fail to see what you find "unexpected" in this code and its behavior. It's very standart OO design. So I tried to explain the OO concepts making it work. Here the "googleable terms" are inheritance and polymorphism. If you have a more precise question, I'll be glad to try to answer it. –  Olivier Croisier Dec 23 '10 at 14:45
1  
I am not sure that interface and implementing code being not on the same root-leaf path in the inheritance tree is "very standart OO design". When I created a question I expected an answer like "ah! this is easy, it's called xxx, works like yyy, that's why it's possible in Java unlike C++". –  bobah Dec 23 '10 at 15:51
    
AH, I see. Looks like the C++ implementation is a restriction of a more general OO supported by Java, where inheritance can occur between classes/interfaces in different packages. –  Olivier Croisier Dec 23 '10 at 16:13

Although CallmeCode class doesn't implement the CallmeIfc interface, it provides the necessary implementation. It is as if class CallmeCode implements the interface. It would have worked also with this code:

interface CallmeIfc {
    public void callme();
}

class CallmeCode implements CallmeIfc {
    public void callme() {
      // implementation  
    }
}

class CallmeImpl extends CallmeCode implements CallmeIfc {
   // empty class body
}

In your case this is fine because class CallmeCode has a method callme. If the method would have been named different it wouldn't compile.

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