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What is the difference between using finally

void ReadFile(int index)
{
    // To run this code, substitute a valid path from your local machine
    string path = @"c:\users\public\test.txt";
    System.IO.StreamReader file = new System.IO.StreamReader(path);
    char[] buffer = new char[10];
    try
    {
        file.ReadBlock(buffer, index, buffer.Length);
    }
    catch (System.IO.IOException e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Error reading from {0}. 
           Message = {1}", path, e.Message);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (file != null)
        {
            file.Close();
        }
    }
    // Do something with buffer...
}

and not using it?

void ReadFile(int index)
{
    // To run this code, substitute a valid path from your local machine
    string path = @"c:\users\public\test.txt";
    System.IO.StreamReader file = new System.IO.StreamReader(path);
    char[] buffer = new char[10];
    try
    {
        file.ReadBlock(buffer, index, buffer.Length);
    }
    catch (System.IO.IOException e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Error reading from {0}. 
            Message = {1}", path, e.Message);
    }

    if (file != null)
    {
        file.Close();
    }

    // Do something with buffer...
}
share|improve this question
3  
The catch block might rethrow the error, raise a new one etc, which will bypass the close out of finally. See here - stackoverflow.com/questions/50618/… –  StuartLC Dec 23 '10 at 14:29
    
I know someone else will type out an answer faster than I can but have you considered causing an IOException and seeing the difference for yourself? –  ChaosPandion Dec 23 '10 at 14:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There, nothing. Here there is though:

bool ReadFile(int index)
{
    try
    {
        // TODO: stuff
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        // TODO: error handling
        return false;
    }
    finally
    {
        // TODO: common cleanup
    }
}

Similarly here:

void ReadFile(int index)
{
    try
    {
        // TODO: stuff
    }
    catch
    {
        // TODO: error handling
        throw;
    }
    finally
    {
        // TODO: common cleanup
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is what I was looking for :) thanks! –  Nico Dec 23 '10 at 14:34
    
Care to accept? ;) –  Dave Downs Dec 23 '10 at 23:19
    
yeah I couldn't then, wasn't on 'til now. –  Nico Dec 24 '10 at 18:36

The difference is that if you don't use finally and an exception other than IOException is thrown your application will be leaking a file handle because the .Close line will never be reached.

Personally I always use using blocks when dealing with disposable resources such as streams:

try
{
    using (var reader = File.OpenText(@"c:\users\public\test.txt"))
    {
        char[] buffer = new char[10];
        reader.ReadBlock(buffer, index, buffer.Length);
         // Do something with buffer...
    }
}
catch (IOException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Error reading from {0}. Message = {1}", path, e.Message);
}

This way I don't have to worry about properly disposing them. The try/finally stuff is handled by the compiler and I can focus on the logic.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah I just copied and pasted an example, what if I didn't specify down to just IOExceptions? –  Nico Dec 23 '10 at 14:31

In your case, nothing. If you let the exception be thrown out of the catch block, then the finally part would run, but the other variation wouldn't.

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Your catch block may throw an exception itself (consider the situation when path is null-reference). Or the exception thrown in try block is not System.IO.IOException, so it is not handled. File handle will not be closed in both cases unless finally used.

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