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The following code prints out the string "T" not the actual typename when the templated function is called. Is there a way to get the real typename without adding anything to the types being templated?

#define stringify(a) #a
#define tostring(a) stringify(a)

template <typename T>
void function_foo(T a, T b)
{
    cout << tostring(T) << endl;
    ...
}
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1  
dupe: see here stackoverflow.com/questions/1488186/… –  Abhay Dec 23 '10 at 14:34
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Templates don't work like that. In your template T specifies a type, and not a sequence of tokens:

typedef int lolztype;
typedef int lulztype;

function_foo<lolztype>(0, 0);
function_foo<lulztype>(0, 0); // calls the *same* template

There is no way to get lolztype or lulztype respectively. What you could try is using typeid(T).name(), but that isn't very helpful because it isn't required to be human readable and not even required to be distinct for each type.

You could try using geordi's file type_strings.hpp, which can print out a human readable string when compiled with GCC.

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do you mean that two types that may have identical internal binary representation, but distinct definitions/declarations might have the same typeid().name() ? –  Stephane Rolland Dec 23 '10 at 14:38
    
@Stephane it's completely unspecified. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 23 '10 at 14:42
    
@Stephane: he means that (for example) int and std::vector<double> might have the same type_info::name(). –  Steve Jessop Dec 23 '10 at 17:17
    
okay, so there's no garanty of interesting result depending on the implementation of the compiler. –  Stephane Rolland Dec 23 '10 at 17:21

use:

#include <typeinfo>

template <typename T>
void function_foo(T a, T b)
{
    cout << typeid(a).name() << endl;
    ...
}

what typeid().name() returns is plateform dependent but is a string representing your type.

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There's the typeid operator. But note that the name() string is implementation-defined. In particular, it often involves some name mangling. Some implementations also provide another public method to get a "prettier" string; check your <typeinfo> header.

#include <typeinfo>
template <typename T>
void function_foo(T a, T b)
{
    std::cout << typeid(a).name() << std::endl;
    // ...
}
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Your only choice is to define this reflection on your own, perhaps via an interface that returns the string representation of its concrete type.

struct my_type : public reflects {
    my_type();
    static const std::string& type_name = "my_type";
};
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