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I have the following directories in my home directory.

  1. source

  2. include

  3. Lib

In source directory I have the following files:

a.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include "a.h"

extern void function(void);

int main() 
{

    printf("PREDEFINED = %d\n",PREDEFINED); 
    function();  
    return 0; 
}

b.c

#include <stdio.h>
void function() 
{
    printf("Hello from function\n"); 
}

a.h

#define PREDEFINED 100

I compiled b.c and moved b.o to Lib folder.

Then I tried the following command from source folder

gcc -Wall -o temp a.c -I../include -L../Lib

But it is showing the following error a.c: undefined reference tofunction``

But when I use the following command, it produces output file temp without any error

gcc -Wall -o temp a.c -I../include ../Lib/b.o

Where am I going wrong?

share|improve this question
    
You should really define function() in a header file, e.g. "b.h" and include it in "a.c". Anyway, what are you actually trying to do? Build "b.c" as a library? Your make system is very non standard. For quick command line builds it is more usual to compile all the C files at the same time into the executable and not bother with object files. For proper make systems it is more usual to compile all C files into object files and then link those into the executable. You have a mix here. –  AlastairG Dec 23 '10 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

An object file is not a library. Try this to create and use a simple static library:

ar rcs ../Lib/libb.a b.o
gcc -Wall -o temp a.c -I../include -L../Lib -lb

A static library usually contains multiple objects. You would add the complete list of objects to the ar line. Note that the option -l{name} causes the linker to find a file named lib{name}.a.

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In the first command you merely define Lib as a place to look for libraries. However you do not specify any libraries to link in, and anyway the library path is not used to look for object files.

In the second command you explicitly specify the object file to use as an input to the linker.

Hence with the first command the function function() is not found and with the second command it is.

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