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Is it possible to do the following using javascript/jquery?

using setInterval with an array of function names, if the array only has 1 function, it should do the following if the user opens the webpage at 10:00:00

function 1 - 10:00:00
function 1 - 10:00:01
function 1 - 10:00:02
function 1 - 10:00:03
function 1 - 10:00:04

then if the user clicks another button, a new function name gets added to the array, which ends up doing the following:

function 1 - 10:00:05
function 2 - 10:00:06
function 1 - 10:00:07
function 2 - 10:00:08
function 1 - 10:00:09
function 2 - 10:00:10
function 1 - 10:00:11
function 2 - 10:00:12
function 1 - 10:00:13

if the user clicks the button a 3rd time, a new function name gets added to the array, which ends up doing the following:

function 1 - 10:00:14
function 2 - 10:00:15
function 3 - 10:00:16
function 1 - 10:00:17
function 2 - 10:00:18
function 3 - 10:00:19
function 1 - 10:00:20
function 2 - 10:00:21
function 3 - 10:00:22

Is this possible? If it is possible, could someone please help me with some example script on how to get this to happen?

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4  
Yes, it's possible. –  Pointy Dec 23 '10 at 14:58
    
Definitely not impossible. Edited tags. –  ybo Dec 23 '10 at 15:02
    
Point taken! I've edited my original question –  oshirowanen Dec 23 '10 at 15:04
    
I note that your question is worded to refer to a list of "function names". In my answer I assumed that a list of actual function instances would work out just as well, but perhaps there's some detail that's been left out. –  Pointy Dec 23 '10 at 15:09
    
To give more detail, I have an ajax based webpage which gets a list of "widgets" which are basically javascript functions stored in a database. The user can choose which widgets to display on his/her screen. Each widget needs to be as real time as possible, but I didn't want to overload the server if the user has 10 widgets on the screen all querying the database every second, so I thought, the more widgets they have, the more spaced out their requests fro the server should be, i.e. no more than 1 request per user per second. –  oshirowanen Dec 23 '10 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A simple mechanism:

var intervalWork = (function() {
  var workers = [], wi = 0;
  var interval = setInterval(function() {
    if (!workers.length) return;
    workers[wi](wi);
    wi = (wi + 1) % workers.length;
  }, 60 * 1000);

  return function(w) {
    workers.push(w);
  };
})();

Then you have a function called "intervalWork" that allows a function to be added to the queue. One function per timer interval (60 seconds here) will be run. The functions are passed their index in the queue; that doesn't seem generally interesting but it'd let you print out those messages.

The function would be called like this:

intervalWork(function(index) {
  // do interesting stuff
  console.log("Function " + index + " " + new Date());
});

Or you could call it and pass the name of an already-defined function:

intervalWork(someRandomFunction);

You could of course make this fancier and provide for other execution modes, or whatever. You didn't describe the overall point of this code so I don't really know what more you'd want.

edit — one more note: many people might (rightly) suggest that instead of a timer driven by the browser's setInterval() mechanism, it might be better to use setTimeout() and do the work of setting up each subsequent timer yourself. That can be important in cases much like yours, where the amount of work done is sort-of unbounded because you don't control what those "worker" functions do. The basic setup would be the same however.

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Shouldn't it also handle clear interval? –  vsr Dec 23 '10 at 15:06
    
Yes, stopping the timer, re-starting it, removing entries from the worker list, even clearing out the whole list to start over; all those things might be added to this mechanism. –  Pointy Dec 23 '10 at 15:08
    
I think this is an excellent base for me to build on. –  oshirowanen Dec 23 '10 at 15:11
    
+1 Very nice... –  user113716 Dec 23 '10 at 15:13
    
how would I run everything in the array? Like this? intervalWork(); –  oshirowanen Dec 23 '10 at 15:30
var functions = [function () {console.log('function 1')}];
var idx = 0;

setInterval(function () {
  functions[idx]();
  idx = (idx + 1) % functions.length;
}, 1000);

// on button click:
functions.push(function () {console.log('function 2')});
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