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Could someone show me a working constructor?
DateTime::Format::Builder::Parser::Regex

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use 5.012;
use DateTime::Format::Builder;
use DateTime::Format::Builder::Parser::Regex;

my $parser = DateTime::Format::Builder->create_parser(
    regex  => qr/^(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)T(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)$/,
    length => 13,
    params => [ qw( year month day hour minute second ) ],
    postprocess => \&_fix_year,
    extra => {time_zone => "Australia/Sydney" },
    constructor => ..., ###
);

sub _fix_year {
    my %args = @_;
    my ( $date, $p ) = @args{ qw( input parsed ) };
    $p->{year} += $p->{year} > 69 ? 1900 : 2000;
    return 1;
}

edit: Changed regex so postprocess fix_year does make more sense;

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I started reading the doco at the same point as you. Phew!

After a bit of back-tracking, it appears that this module effectively works behind the scenes and DateTime::Format::Builder calls it as a plugin. So using the regular idiom of creating your own parse class, I'm thinking its:

#!/usr/bin/perl
package MyDateParser;
use common::sense;

use DateTime;
use DateTime::Format::Builder;
use DateTime::Format::Builder::Parser::Regex;

use DateTime::Format::Builder(
    parsers => {
        parse_datetime => {
            regex  => qr/^(\d\d\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)T(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)$/,
            length => 15,
            params => [ qw( year month day hour minute second ) ],
            postprocess => \&_fix_year,
            extra => {time_zone => "Australia/Sydney" },
            constructor => \&_construct_date,
        }
    }
);

sub _fix_year {
    my %args = @_;
    my ( $date, $p ) = @args{ qw( input parsed ) };
    $p->{year} += $p->{year} > 69 ? 1900 : 2000;
    return 1;
}

sub _construct_date {
    my ($p, %extra) = @_;
    use Data::Dumper; warn Dumper {p => $p, extra => \%extra};
    return DateTime->new( %extra );
}

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

package main;

my $dt = MyDateParser->parse_datetime('00101223T094517');

Also have a look at the create_constructor() method in DateTime::Format::Builder, which sets up a default constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
So I didn't need to write my own constructor. –  sid_com Dec 24 '10 at 7:45
    
If I commend out the "use DateTime::Format::Builder::Parser::Regex;" the the script works anyway –  sid_com Dec 24 '10 at 7:47
    
First I thought "use common::sense" should be a joke, but there is really a module named "common::sense". –  sid_com Dec 24 '10 at 7:50
    
@sid_com: common:sense is more or less a replacement for use strict + use warnings. Has some nicer defaults in some cases. –  dwarring Dec 25 '10 at 5:20

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