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This is the code:

package com.XXX;
public final class Foo {
  private Foo() {
    // intentionally empty
  }
  public static int bar() {
    return 1;
  }
}

This is the test:

package com.XXX;
public FooTest {
  @Test 
  void testValidatesThatBarWorks() {
    int result = Foo.bar();
    assertEquals(1, result);
  }
  @Test(expected = java.lang.IllegalAccessException.class)
  void testValidatesThatClassFooIsNotInstantiable() {
    Class cls = Class.forName("com.XXX.Foo");
    cls.newInstance(); // exception here
  }
}

Works fine, the class is tested. But Cobertura says that there is zero code coverage of the private constructor of the class. How can we add test coverage to such a private constructor?

share|improve this question
    
It seems to me as if you are trying to enforce the Singleton pattern. If so, you might like dp4j.com (which does exactly that) –  simpatico Feb 22 '11 at 20:59

12 Answers 12

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Well, there are ways you could potentially use reflection etc - but is it really worth it? This is a constructor which should never be called, right?

If there's an annotation or anything similar that you can add to the class to make Cobertura understand that it won't be called, do that: I don't think it's worth going through hoops to add coverage artificially.

EDIT: If there's no way of doing it, just live with the slightly reduced coverage. Remember that coverage is meant to be something which is useful to you - you should be in charge of the tool, not the other way round.

share|improve this answer
    
This is how it works in Cobertura: stackoverflow.com/questions/951569 –  yegor256 Dec 23 '10 at 15:51
5  
I don't want to "slightly reduce coverage" in the entire project just because of this particular constructor.. –  yegor256 Dec 23 '10 at 20:34
9  
@Vincenzo: Then IMO you're placing too high a value on a simple number. Coverage is an indicator of testing. Don't be a slave to a tool. The point of coverage is to give you a level of confidence, and to suggest areas for extra testing. Artificially calling an otherwise unused constructor doesn't help with either of those points. –  Jon Skeet Dec 23 '10 at 20:54
4  
@JonSkeet: I totally agree with "Don't be a slave to a tool", but it does not smell good to remember every "flaw count" in every project. How to make sure the 7/9 result is Cobertura limitation, and not programmer's? A new programmer must enter every failure (that can be a lot in large projects) to check class-by-class. –  Eduardo Costa Dec 6 '11 at 14:50
1  
Archimedes has it right IMO. He is testing the code, and at the same time providing full coverage. He is ensuring that coding standards are followed and thereby making it harder for a coder to use the class improperly. Also, given that he's captured the coding standards in a test, the effort to test becomes negligible and there is a real benefit realized. I swiped the code and I'm using it now. Thanks Archimedes :) –  Matt Friedman Feb 14 '13 at 0:47

I don't entirely agree with Jon Skeet. I think that if you can get an easy win to give you coverage and eliminate the noise in your coverage report, then you should do it. Either tell your coverage tool to ignore the constructor, or put the idealism aside and write the following test and be done with it:

@Test
public void testConstructorIsPrivate() throws NoSuchMethodException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException, InstantiationException {
  Constructor<Foo> constructor = Foo.class.getDeclaredConstructor();
  assertTrue(Modifier.isPrivate(constructor.getModifiers()));
  constructor.setAccessible(true);
  constructor.newInstance();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
But this is eliminating noise in the coverage report by adding noise to the test suite. I would have just ended the sentence at "put the idealism aside". :) –  Christopher Orr Oct 17 '11 at 15:27
4  
To give this test any sort of meaning, you should probably also assert that the constructor's access level is what you expect it to be. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 23 '11 at 19:21
    
Adding the evil reflection plus Jeremy's ideas plus a meanful name like "testIfConstructorIsPrivateWithoutRaisingExceptions", I guess this is "THE" answer. –  Eduardo Costa Dec 6 '11 at 14:52
    
@JeremyHeiler - Done –  Javid Jamae Feb 14 '13 at 18:43
1  
This is syntactically incorrect is it not? What is constructor? Shouldn't Constructor be parameterized and not a raw type? –  Adam Parkin Mar 22 '13 at 18:41

Although it's not necessarily for coverage, I created this method to verify that the utility class is well defined and do a bit of coverage as well.

/**
 * Verifies that a utility class is well defined.
 * 
 * @param clazz
 *            utility class to verify.
 */
public static void assertUtilityClassWellDefined(final Class<?> clazz)
        throws NoSuchMethodException, InvocationTargetException,
        InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
    Assert.assertTrue("class must be final",
            Modifier.isFinal(clazz.getModifiers()));
    Assert.assertEquals("There must be only one constructor", 1,
            clazz.getDeclaredConstructors().length);
    final Constructor<?> constructor = clazz.getDeclaredConstructor();
    if (constructor.isAccessible() || 
                !Modifier.isPrivate(constructor.getModifiers()) {
        Assert.fail("constructor is not private");
    }
    constructor.setAccessible(true);
    constructor.newInstance();
    constructor.setAccessible(false);
    for (final Method method : clazz.getMethods()) {
        if (!Modifier.isStatic(method.getModifiers())
                && method.getDeclaringClass().equals(clazz)) {
            Assert.fail("there exists a non-static method:" + method);
        }
    }
}

I have placed the full code and examples in https://github.com/trajano/maven-jee6/tree/master/maven-jee6-test

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Not only does this solve the problem without tricking the tool, but it fully tests the coding standards of setting up a utility class. I had to change the accessibility test to use Modifier.isPrivate as isAccessible was returning true for private constructors in some cases (mocking library interference?). –  David Harkness Nov 11 '12 at 0:40
1  
I really want to add this to JUnit's Assert class, but don't want to take credit for your work. I think it's very good. It would be great to have Assert.utilityClassWellDefined() in JUnit 4.12+. Have you considered a pull request? –  Visionary Software Solutions Feb 25 '13 at 11:13
1  
    
Note that using setAccessible() to make the constructor accessible causes problems for Sonar's code coverage tool (when I do this the class disappears from the code coverage reports of Sonar). –  Adam Parkin Mar 22 '13 at 20:14
    
Thanks, I do reset the accessible flag though. Perhaps it's a bug on Sonar itself? –  Archimedes Trajano Mar 23 '13 at 3:31

I had made private the constructor of my class of static utility functions, to satisfy CheckStyle. But like the original poster, I had Cobertura complaining about the test. At first I tried this approach, but this doesn't affect the coverage report because the constructor is never actually executed. So really all this tests is if the constructor is remaining private - and this is made redundant by the accessibility check in the subsequent test.

@Test(expected=IllegalAccessException.class)
public void testConstructorPrivate() throws Exception {
    MyUtilityClass.class.newInstance();
    fail("Utility class constructor should be private");
}

I went with Javid Jamae's suggestion and used reflection, but added assertions to catch anybody messing with the class being tested (and named the test to indicate High Levels Of Evil).

@Test
public void evilConstructorInaccessibilityTest() throws Exception {
    Constructor[] ctors = MyUtilityClass.class.getDeclaredConstructors();
    assertEquals("Utility class should only have one constructor",
            1, ctors.length);
    Constructor ctor = ctors[0];
    assertFalse("Utility class constructor should be inaccessible", 
            ctor.isAccessible());
    ctor.setAccessible(true); // obviously we'd never do this in production
    assertEquals("You'd expect the construct to return the expected type",
            MyUtilityClass.class, ctor.newInstance().getClass());
}

This is so overkill, but I gotta admit I like the warm fuzzy feeling of 100% method coverage.

share|improve this answer
    
Overkill it may be, but if it was in Unitils or similar, I'd use it –  Stewart Jul 30 '12 at 16:48
    
+1 Good start, though I went with Archimedes's more complete test. –  David Harkness Nov 11 '12 at 0:39
    
The first example doesn't work - the IllegalAccesException means the constructor is never called, so coverage is not recorded. –  Tom McIntyre Jan 24 '13 at 10:27

The reasoning behind testing code that doesn't do anything is to achieve 100% code coverage and to notice when the code coverage drops. Otherwise one could always think, hey I don't have 100% code coverage anymore but it's PROBABLY because of my private constructors. This makes it easy to spot untested methods without having to check that it just was a private constructor. As your codebase grows you'll actually feel a nice warm feeling looking at 100% instead of 99%.

IMO it's best to use reflection here since otherwise you would have to either get a better code coverage tool that ignores these constructors or somehow tell the code coverage tool to ignore the method (perhaps an Annotation or a configuration file) because then you would be stuck with a specific code coverage tool.

In a perfect world all code coverage tools would ignore private constructors that belong to a final class because the constructor is there as a "security" measure nothing else:)
I would use this code:

    @Test
    public void callPrivateConstructorsForCodeCoverage() throws SecurityException, NoSuchMethodException, IllegalArgumentException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException
    {
        Class<?>[] classesToConstruct = {Foo.class};
        for(Class<?> clazz : classesToConstruct)
        {
            Constructor<?> constructor = clazz.getDeclaredConstructor();
            constructor.setAccessible(true);
            assertNotNull(constructor.newInstance());
        }
    }
And then just add classes to the array as you go.

share|improve this answer

I don't know about Cobertura but I use Clover and it has a means of adding pattern-matching exclusions. For example, I have patterns that exclude apache-commons-logging lines so they are not counted in the coverage.

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Another option is to create a static initializer similar to the following code

class YourClass {
  private YourClass() {
  }
  static {
     new YourClass();
  }

  // real ops
}

This way the private constructor is considered tested, and the runtime overhead is basically not measurable. I do this to get 100% coverage using EclEmma, but likely it works out for every coverage tool. The drawback with this solution, of course, is that you write production code (the static initializer) just for testing purposes.

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I do this quite a bit. Cheap as in inexpensive, cheap as in dirty, but effective. –  pholser Jun 17 '11 at 21:04
    
That is bluffing the tool. –  Monster Truck Aug 6 '12 at 12:23
    
With Sonar, this actually causes the class to be missed entirely by code coverage. –  Adam Parkin Mar 22 '13 at 18:32

Sometimes Cobertura marks code not intended to be executed as 'not covered', there's nothing wrong with that. Why are you concerned with having 99% coverage instead of 100%?

Technically, though, you can still invoke that constructor with reflection, but it sounds very wrong to me (in this case).

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You can't.

You're apparently creating the private constructor to prevent instantiation of a class that is intended to contain only static methods. Rather than trying to get coverage of this constructor (which would require that the class be instantiated), you should get rid of it and trust your developers not to add instance methods to the class.

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1  
That's incorrect; you can instantiate it through reflection, as noted above. –  theotherian Sep 10 '11 at 15:07

Finally, there is solution!

public enum Foo {;
  public static int bar() {
    return 1;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is that testing the class which is posted in the question though? You shouldn't assume that you can turn every class with a private constructor into an enum, or that you'd want to. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '12 at 16:04
    
@JonSkeet I can for the class in question. And most of utility classes which have only bunch of static methods. Otherwise a class with the only private constructor doesn't have any sense. –  kan Jan 27 '12 at 16:09
1  
A class with a private constructor may be instantiated from public static methods, although of course then it's easy to get the coverage. But fundamentally I would prefer any class which extends Enum<E> to really be an enum... I believe that reveals intent better. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '12 at 16:11
2  
Wow, I'd absolutely prefer code which makes sense over a pretty arbitrary number. (Coverage is no guarantee of quality, nor is 100% coverage feasible in all cases. Your tests should guide your code at best - not steer it over a cliff of bizarre intentions.) –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '12 at 16:20
1  
@Kan: Adding a dummy call to the constructor to bluff the tool should not be the intent. Anyone who relies on a single metric to determine project's wellbeing is already on the path to destruction. –  Monster Truck Aug 6 '12 at 11:45

If I were to guess the intent of your question I'd say:

  1. You want reasonable checks for private constructors that do actual work, and
  2. You want clover to exclude empty constructors for util classes.

For 1, it is obvious that you want all initialisation to be done via factory methods. In such cases, your tests should be able to test the side effects of the constructor. This should fall under the category of normal private method testing. Make the methods smaller so that they only do a limited number of determinate things (ideally, just one thing and one thing well) and then test the methods that rely on them.

For example, if my [private] constructor sets up my class's instance fields a to 5. Then I can (or rather must) test it:

@Test
public void testInit() {
    MyClass myObj = MyClass.newInstance(); //Or whatever factory method you put
    Assert.assertEquals(5, myObj.getA()); //Or if getA() is private then test some other property/method that relies on a being 5
}

For 2, you can configure clover to exclude Util constructors if you have a set naming pattern for Util classes. E.g., in my own project I use something like this (because we follow the convention that names for all Util classes should end with Util):

<clover-setup initString="${build.dir}/clovercoverage.db" enabled="${with.clover}">
    <methodContext name="prvtCtor" regexp="^private *[a-zA-Z0-9_$]+Util *( *) *"/>
</clover-setup>

I have deliberately left out a .* following ) because such constructors are not meant to throw exceptions (they are not meant to do anything).

There of course can be a third case where you may want to have an empty constructor for a non-utility class. In such cases, I would recommend that you put a methodContext with the exact signature of the constructor.

<clover-setup initString="${build.dir}/clovercoverage.db" enabled="${with.clover}">
    <methodContext name="prvtCtor" regexp="^private *[a-zA-Z0-9_$]+Util *( *) *"/>
    <methodContext name="myExceptionalClassCtor" regexp="^private MyExceptionalClass()$"/>
</clover-setup>

If you have many such exceptional classes then you can choose to modify the generalized private constructor reg-ex I suggested and remove Util from it. In this case, you will have to manually make sure that your constructor's side effects are still tested and covered by other methods in your class/project.

<clover-setup initString="${build.dir}/clovercoverage.db" enabled="${with.clover}">
    <methodContext name="prvtCtor" regexp="^private *[a-zA-Z0-9_$]+ *( *) .*"/>
</clover-setup>
share|improve this answer
@Test
public void testTestPrivateConstructor() {
    Constructor<Test> cnt;
    try {
        cnt = Test.class.getDeclaredConstructor();
        cnt.setAccessible(true);

        cnt.newInstance();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.getMessage();
    }
}

Test.java is your source file,which is having your private constructor

share|improve this answer
    
It would be nice to explain, why this construct helps with coverage. –  Markus Mar 31 '13 at 21:36
    
True, and secondly: why catching an exception in your test? The exception being thrown should actually make the test fail. –  Jordi May 6 '13 at 15:23

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