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can anyone recognize this format (if it is a standard format), or should I explode it manually to get arrays? Thanks.

{ coords : {lon : 7.41891, lat : 43.73253}, address : "", zipCode : "98000", city : "Monaco", sK : "Monaco", sQ : "852", fV : "", fZ : "98000 Monaco", fW : "- MC - Monaco: Monaco (98000)", gf : "31NDFzeHoxMGNORE11TnpNeU5UTT1jTnk0ME1UZzVNUT09", reflexId : "84167", areaLabel : "Monaco", jalon : 4}

YAML to VarExport gives this but then fails.

array (
  'coords' => 
  array (
    'lon' => 20.48406,
    'lat' => 44.80572,
  ),
)

Solution:

$data = preg_replace('#([\w]+) :#is', '"$1" :', $data);

Result:

array (
  'coords' => 
  {
     'lon' => 7.41891,
     'lat' => 43.73253,
  },
  'address' => '',
  'zipCode' => '98000',
  'city' => 'Monaco',
  'sK' => 'Monaco',
  'sQ' => '852',
  'fV' => '',
  'fZ' => '98000 Monaco',
  'fW' => '- MC - Monaco: Monaco (98000)',
  'gf' => '31NDFzeHoxMGNORE11TnpNeU5UTT1jTnk0ME1UZzVNUT09',
  'reflexId' => '84167',
  'areaLabel' => 'Monaco',
  'jalon' => 4,
)
share|improve this question
    
Note: The [] in [\w] are redundant. \w would be enough. – Alin Purcaru Dec 23 '10 at 18:47
    
I used a-zA-Z0-9 first, forgot to delete it. – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 19:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's valid JavaScript code and almost JSON. For it to be valid JSON it would need to have the object property names enclosed in double quotes and have the array items separated by commas.

This:

$text = preg_replace('/(\r?\n){2}/', ',', trim($text));
$text = preg_replace('/([{,])\s?([a-z0-9_]+)\s?:/i', '$1"$2":',$text);
print_r(json_decode($text));

will work for your example.

But you should not use it as it will fail when there are , or { inside values!

The safest approach would be to construct a parser yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is valid, but I am unable to decode it as JSON, decoding like YAML gives some result, but fails at some point. Thanks. – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 16:41
    
Closest match :) I will use it only for this, not anything else. – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 17:00

Looks like json serialization to me, so fairly standard. :)

share|improve this answer
    
won't decode as json, however. Just tried. – DampeS8N Dec 23 '10 at 16:36
    
I'll give it a go later once i am at a computer unless someone else figures it out in the mean time. – Mikael Svenson Dec 23 '10 at 16:39
    
Also tried, YAML gives some result. – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 16:42

Bad JSON. I would convert the hash keys to strings and then json_decode. You can do that with the PHP Tokenizer fairly simply.

function parse($code) {
    $result = '';
    $tokens = tokens_get_all('<?php ' . $code);
    array_shift($tokens); // drop <?php
    foreach ($tokens as $token) {
        if (!is_array($token)) {
            $result .= $token;
            continue;
        }

        if ($token[0] == T_STRING) {
            $token[1] = '\'' . addslashes($token[1]) . '\'';
        }

        $result .= $token[1];
    }

    return json_decode($result);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for direction, I used preg_replace, everything decodes nicely (JSON)... – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 16:54

After doing some research, it definitely looks like improperly formatted JSON. However, it's not too far off. In fact, with two regular expressions you could easily convert the string to proper JSON.

Find:
    /(\w+)\s+\:/
Replace:
    "$1" :

Find:
    /(})(\s+{)/
Replace:
    $1,$2

You can do it like this in PHP:

$good_json = preg_replace(array('/(\w+)\s+\:/i','/(})(\s+{)/'), array('"\1" :', '\1,\2'), $bad_json);
var_dump( json_decode($good_json) );
share|improve this answer
    
Solved it already, thank you. – Dejan Marjanovic Dec 23 '10 at 17:00

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