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After numerically solving a differential equation and plotting the results I would like to determine the single maximum value in the plotted range but do not know how.

The code below works for numerically solving the differential equation and plotting the results.

s = NDSolve[{x''[t] + x[t] - 0.167 x[t]^3 == 0.005 Cos[t + -0.0000977162*t^2/2], x[0] == 0, x'[0] == 0}, x, {t, 0, 1000}]

Plot[Evaluate[x[t] /. s], {t, 0, 1000}, 
Frame -> {True, True, False, False}, FrameLabel -> {"t", "x"}, FrameStyle -> Directive[FontSize -> 15], Axes -> False]

Mathematica graphics

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use NMaximize

First approximation:

s = NDSolve[{x''[t] + x[t] - 0.167 x[t]^3 ==  
            0.005 Cos[t + -0.0000977162*t^2/2], x[0] == 0, x'[0] == 0}, x[t], 
            {t, 0, 1000}]
NMaximize[{Evaluate[x[t] /. s[[1]]] , 100 < t < 1000}, t]  

{1.26625, {t -> 821.674}}  

As your function is a rapid oscillation like this : alt text , it doesn't catch the real max value, as you may see below:

Plot[{1.26625, Evaluate[x[t] /. s[[1]]]}, {t, 790, 830}, 
 Frame -> {True, True, False, False}, FrameLabel -> {"t", "x"}, 
 FrameStyle -> Directive[FontSize -> 15], Axes -> False, 
 PlotRange -> {{790, 830}, {1.25, 1.27}}]

alt text

So we refine our bounds, and tune a little the NMaximize function:

NMaximize[{Evaluate[x[t] /. s[[1]]] , 814 < t < 816}, t, 
 AccuracyGoal -> 20, PrecisionGoal -> 18, MaxIterations -> 1000]  

NMaximize::cvmit: Failed to converge to the requested accuracy or 
                  precision within 1000 iterations. >>

{1.26753, {t -> 814.653}}  

It failed to converge within the required accuracy, but now the result is good enough

Plot[{1.2675307922753962`, Evaluate[x[t] /. s[[1]]]}, {t, 790, 830}, 
 Frame -> {True, True, False, False}, FrameLabel -> {"t", "x"}, 
 FrameStyle -> Directive[FontSize -> 15], Axes -> False, 
 PlotRange -> {{790, 830}, {1.25, 1.27}}]

alt text

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Any reason why you don't like FindMaximum[]? :) –  user414706 Dec 25 '10 at 2:45
    
@J. M. Because NMaximize attempts to find a GLOBAL maximum, while FindMaximum works well for LOCAL extremes. For an oscillating function NMaximize works better for me. See for example here reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/ref/FindMaximum.html the first example under Basic Examples –  belisarius Dec 25 '10 at 20:12
    
@J. M. Could have used FindMaximum[] the second time, though. –  belisarius Dec 27 '10 at 1:58
    
Well, it's a univariate function, and one would certainly plot the thing before trying to find roots or optima, right? I say this because bringing in the machinery of NMaximize[] (Nelder-Mead by default) is a bit wasteful in the univariate case, when the methods of FindMaximum[] are adequate. The reason for plotting before optimizing of course is that these iterative methods tend to go astray if not given a good starting point (i.e., GIGO). –  user414706 Dec 27 '10 at 3:14
    
@J. M. With rapid oscillating functions, sometimes I found Plot[] deceiving. That's why I usually give a try to NMaximize. As for the wasteful part, I don't agree ... as while it's running I get my share of coffee :) –  belisarius Dec 27 '10 at 3:26

You can use Reap and Sow to extract a list of values from any evaluation. For a simple Plot you would Sow the value of the function you are plotting and enclose the entire plot in a Reap:

list = Reap[
          Plot[Sow@Evaluate[x[t] /. s], {t, 0, 1000}, 
          Frame -> {True, True, False, False},
          FrameLabel -> {"t", "x"}, 
          FrameStyle -> Directive[FontSize -> 15],
          Axes -> False]];

The first element of list is the plot itself and the second element is the list of x-values Mathematica used in the plot. To get the Maximum:

In[1]  := Max[lst[[2, 1]]]
Out[1] := 1.26191
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I guess using some Options in Plot[] it is possible to scan the conflicting spikes in depth –  belisarius Dec 23 '10 at 21:37
    
Moreover, the Sowed value is in the neighbor peak to the left of the real max ... –  belisarius Dec 23 '10 at 22:49

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