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We have an Employee Self Service application running on standalone server. One of the feature of the application is "forgotten password", so employees can reset their own passwords. It works fine an all servers, but not on Windows Server 2008 R2. Below is a fragment of code we use:

User.Invoke("SetPassword", new object[] {"#12345Abc"});
User.CommitChanges();

It looks like it is not possible to make it work in Windows Server 2008 R2 at all. If someone has it works, please help.

Thanks

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What exception did you get? –  John Saunders Dec 23 '10 at 18:45
    
We got exception: "General access denied error". It was weird. We provided user/password of some user from the local Administrators group. –  Dionysus Dec 23 '10 at 18:46
    
What do you mean that you provided the user/password of an admin user? Where did you provide this? Also, what user does the app pool run under? Finally, have you checked the security event logs of the server to see what user is attempting the call? –  Chris Lively Dec 23 '10 at 19:40
    
We started our application under user login with administartor rights. But we didn't login as Administartor itself. Under Administrator login application worked fine. –  Dionysus Dec 23 '10 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

Try UserPrincipal.SetPassword. It's a higher level abstraction and thus smarter. It will know what lower level function to call. The invoke way seems way too fragile to me.

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We also tried this one:

PrincipalContext context = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Machine, "servername");

UserPrincipal up = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(context, IdentityType.SamAccountName, "username");
if (up != null)
{
    up.SetPassword("newpassword");
    // We got the same access denied exception here
    up.Save();
}
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1  
Can you see the audit log what user tries to change the password? When you call into the AD, you do that with a current user identity. Apparently that identity is different under Win2k8r2. –  fejesjoco Dec 23 '10 at 19:05
    
It looks that Microsoft put more security restriction on SetPassword. We made it worked on Windows Server 2008 using some setting of local security pocily related to User Access Control staff. –  Dionysus Dec 23 '10 at 20:25

protected by Greg Hewgill May 25 '12 at 1:06

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