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As a parallel to my question about Useful stock SQL datasets, I wonder if anyone has come across a library/web page/wiki/etc. that contains stock SQL data models. For example, the problem of maintaining table(s) for login credentials is faced by countless developers. Are any of you aware of a data model that provides a best-practices implementation of this table? What about other use cases? I'm thinking about things like inventory control, sales reporting, application events (login, logout, viewing a given page or item, etc.). I came across a great resource at databaseanswers.org, but wonder if there are any other resources I should take a look at.

As with my question on data sets, I'm looking for things that can readily incorporated into an application, fulfill a generic need that many developers have, and something that is not specific to a single industry or business sector. Address books, login credential tables, messaging, etc. all fall into the criteria I'm thinking about.

Any thoughts?

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While not subjective, this question has no useful answers. The only straightforward question you ask is "Are any of you aware...". The answer is either yes or no. Normal Forms are the pattern you need, how you apply that form is purely requirements driven. –  Stephanie Page Jan 5 '11 at 21:54
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

Have you seen the SO question relational-database-design-patterns?

EDIT: Having got interested in this question I had a look for any books on the subject and found the following volumes:

The Data Model Resource Book: A Library of Universal Data Models for All Enterprises: Vol 1

The Data Model Resource Book: A Library of Universal Data Models by Industry Types: Vol 2

The Data Model Resource Book: Universal Patterns for Data Modeling Vol 3

I've not read the series, so I can't recommend them myself, but they look interesting.

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@Shadowman: I just bought those volumes, while they offer great insight in many areas and problems I find them quite overwhelming (like a ~35 entity model just for storing addresses and contacts for a "generic" use). –  Alix Axel Oct 6 '11 at 20:05
    
@Alix Axel - Thanks for sharing your views on these books, I'd like to know more of your thoughts if you are willing to write reviews of them as I'm tempted to buy them myself. –  Tony Oct 6 '11 at 21:40
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Here is a list of professional standard scbemas of ebXML: http://docs.oasis-open.org/ubl/os-UBL-2.0/xsd/maindoc/

They are not exactly "Data models" but schemas for message exchanging, but can help you model your data.

Avoid use "Standard data models" (like the dbanswers), they are poor, and can't address even the most common scenarios.

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+1 for "they are poor" –  Stephanie Page Jan 5 '11 at 21:55
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