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I am writing a function in R that will evaluate the fit of a model, but each model takes the same arguments. How can I avoid repeating the same argument to each call to a model?

It is probably more clear here, where the arguments

  data=data,
  na.action = na.exclude,
  subset = block == site)

Are repeated.

modelfit <- function(order, response, predictor, site) {
   if(order == 0) {
     m <- lm(response ~ 1, 
             data=data,
             na.action = na.exclude,
             subset = block == site)
   } else if (is.numeric(order)) {
     m <- lm(response ~ poly(predictor, order), 
             data=data,
             na.action = na.exclude,
             subset = block == site)
   } else if (order == 'monod') {
     x<-predictor
     m <- nls(response ~ a*x/(b+x),
              start = list(a=1, b=1),
              data=data,
              na.action = na.exclude,
              subset = block == site)
   } else if (order == 'log') {
     m <- lm(response ~ poly(log(predictor), 1),
             data=data,
             na.action = na.exclude,
              subset = block == site)
   }
   AIC(m)
 }

Additional suggestions for better approaches to this question always appreciated.

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2  
I wouldn't call your data data - give it a better name that doesn't class. –  Gavin Simpson Dec 23 '10 at 21:10
    
@Gavin thank you for explaining this to me in your answer... would d suffice, or do you have other recommendations? data is just so convenient... –  Abe Dec 23 '10 at 23:29
    
call it what you want - just avoid data. data() is a function for loading example data sets in R and a large number of functions have a 'data' argument. Calling your data data will just add to the confusion. In my example, I used myData but normally I real data analysis tasks, I name the data frame something relevant like pollen or chemistry as the name tells me what is in the data frame. –  Gavin Simpson Dec 24 '10 at 9:31
1  
From the wisdom of the R-Help list, fortune(77): "Firstly, don't call your matrix 'matrix'. Would you call your dog 'dog'? Anyway, it might clash with the function 'matrix'. -- Barry Rowlingson". The lesson is: avoid using names that mask common functions and try to use names that describe the contents of a variable. –  Sharpie Dec 24 '10 at 23:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the ... idiom to do this. You include ... in the argument definition of your function and then within the lm() calls include ... as an extra argument. The ... effectively is a placeholder for all the extra arguments you wish to pass. Here is a (not tested) modification of your function that employs this approach:

modelfit <- function(order, response, predictor, site, ...) {
   if(order == 0) {
     m <- lm(response ~ 1, ...)
   } else if (is.numeric(order)) {
     m <- lm(response ~ poly(predictor, order), ...)
   } else if (order == 'monod') {
     x<-predictor
     m <- nls(response ~ a*x/(b+x), start = list(a=1, b=1), ...)
   } else if (order == 'log') {
     m <- lm(response ~ poly(log(predictor), 1), ...)
   }
   AIC(m)
 }

You then call this function and provide the repeated arguments in place of ...:

with(myData, modelfit(2, myResponse, myPredictor, mySite, data = myData, 
                      na.action = na.exclude, subset = block == mySite))

where myResponse, myPredictor and mySite are the variables you want to use that exist in your myData data frame.

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1  
I think that you would need to either use with(myData, modelfit()) or modelfit(2, myData$myResponse, myData$myPredictor, myDataa$mySite, data = myData, na.action = na.exclude, subset = block == myData$mySite) see my answer for a workable example. –  David Dec 24 '10 at 0:34
    
@David: thanks for pointing that out. The perils of not having a reproducible example to work with. I've edited my answer to fix the problem. –  Gavin Simpson Dec 24 '10 at 9:27

I would like to clarify a point in Gavin's answer with a simplified example:

Here is a dataframe d:

d <- data.frame(x1 = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2),
                x2 = c(1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2),
                y  = c(1, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8))

Here is a function:

mf <- function(response, predictor, ...) {
  lm(response~predictor, ...)
}

Note that

mf(d$y, d$x1, subset = d$x2 == 1, data = d)

works, but

mf(y, x1, subset = x2 == 1, data = d)

does not.

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