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i'm new in c++ world, i just use it for litle app that help me in my work, now, i need to read the content of a folder, list the folder content, i've made a function that return a pointer with the name of every obj in the folder, but now, i don't know how to read the content of the pointer to just print it in a console, my function look like this

string* listdir (const char *path)
{
    string* result = new string[50]; // limit to 50 obj
    DIR *pdir = NULL;
    pdir = opendir (path);
    struct dirent *pent = NULL;
    if (pdir == NULL)
    { 
        printf ("\nERROR! pdir could not be initialised correctly");
        return NULL;
    } 
    int i = 0;
    while (pent = readdir (pdir))
    {
        if (pent == NULL)
        {
            printf ("\nERROR! pent could not be initialised correctly");
            return NULL;
        }
        //printf ("%s\n", pent->d_name);
        result[i++]= pent->d_name;
    }

    closedir (pdir);
    return result;
}

i've been trying to print the result of teh function

int main()
{
    string *dirs;
    dirs = listdir("c:\\");
    int i = 0;
    //while(dirs[i])
    //{
            //cout<<dirs[i]<<'\n';
            //++i;
    //}
}

but i really don't know what i'm doing, lol, some help would be perfect thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Is string the std::string? – Georg Fritzsche Dec 23 '10 at 21:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C++, dereferencing a pointer is achieved using the * operator, just like in 'C'.

However, there are a number of problems with your code, which I have addressed here because I was bored...

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <dirent.h>

typedef std::list<std::string> dir_list;

bool listdir(const std::string& path, dir_list& result)
{
    bool retval = true;
    DIR* pdir = opendir(path.c_str());
    if (pdir == NULL)
    {
        std::cerr << "ERROR! pdir could not be initialised correctly" << std::endl;;
        retval = false;
    }
    else
    {
        for (dirent* pent = readdir(pdir); pent != NULL; pent = readdir(pdir))
        {
            if (pent == NULL && result.empty())
            {
                std::cerr << "ERROR! pent could not be initialised correctly" << std::endl;
                retval = false;
            }

            if (result.size() < 50)
            {// *really* limit to 50!
                result.push_back(pent->d_name);
            }
        }
        closedir(pdir);
    }
    return retval;
}

int main()
{
    dir_list dirs;
    if (listdir("C:/", dirs))
    {
        for (dir_list::const_iterator iter(dirs.begin()), end(dirs.end()); iter != end; ++iter)
        {
            std::cout << *iter << std::endl;
        }
    }
}

Since you're using C++, STL, its string and container classes will save you a World of pointer pain!

share|improve this answer

Examine your while loop condition : dirs[i] is a std::string. You are using a string object in a boolean context : would you expect std::string to convert to bool ?

My recommendation : ditch the fixed sized array and go for std::vector.

void listdir(const char *path, std::vector<std::string> &dirs)
{
    /* ... */
    while (pent = readdir (pdir))
    {
        /* ... */
        dirs.push_back(pent->d-name);
    }

    closedir(pdir);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> dirs;

    listdir("c:\\", dirs);
    for (std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator it = dirs.begin(), end = dirs.end(); it != end; ++it)
        std::cout << *it << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Better answer. IMHO, should use a constructor or cast when appending to the vector; this illustrates the actual conversion. – Thomas Matthews Dec 23 '10 at 21:41
    
I also think that the listdir function should return by value, not return by passed reference. – Puppy Dec 23 '10 at 23:11
int main()
{
    string *dirs;
    dirs = listdir("c:\\");
    for (int i = 0; i < 50 && dirs[i].size() > 0; ++i)
    {
            cout << dirs[i] << '\n';
    }
}

dirs is a pointer to an array, so you can index it like an array. You created an array of 50, so you need to limit yourself to 50 here too. Since you might not have populated the whole array, the .size() check allows the printing loop to stop early.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm out of votes today, but this should be voted up. @Andrew's answer will fail horribly if dirs is full. – marcog Dec 23 '10 at 21:28
    
@marcog: Sorry, can't downvote you; you neglected to delete the results, thus creating a memory leak. See @icecrime's answer using std::vector and std::string. – Thomas Matthews Dec 23 '10 at 21:44
    
@Thomas Technically it doesn't matter, since the deletion would be right at the end of main(). But it's not my answer, I was just commenting due to the accepted answer having a nasty hole. :) – marcog Dec 23 '10 at 21:49

There is some major confusion in your code, especially between arrays of characters, strings and arrays of strings. Also, there is a memory leak.

Here are my questions / concerns:

Issues / Concerns

  1. The opendir function may be called with a null parameter. You should check for a null path before calling opendir.
  2. Returns NULL after declaring some variables. IMHO, one should check parameters before declaring variables.
  3. How does one know how many valid entries are in the returned array?
  4. If the size of the array (known only to the listdir function) changes, the users of the function are doomed.
  5. Is the type of pent->d_name the same as string *?
  6. The address of the directory name, pent->d_name, is copied into the results array, but not the content of the directory name. The OS may reuse this location without telling you; so copying the address of the text is not a good idea.
  7. The main function does not delete the memory allocated for the results. This is known as a memory leak.

Suggestions / Fixes

  1. Use std::string within the function. This takes care of allocating memory for text.
  2. Use std::vector<string> for the results. This takes care of knowing the quantity of directories and no need to dynamically allocate or deallocate memory.
  3. Create a std::string from the pent->d_name and use push_back to append the string to the results.
share|improve this answer

your while statement looks strange, it looks like it's expecting dirs[i] to be a pointer, but I believe dirs[i] will be a non-pointer type. Maybe change it to (assuming string is std::string):

while(i < 50 && dirs[i].length() > 0)
{
        cout<<dirs[i]<<'\n';
        ++i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ups, just perfect, thanks bro – Kstro21 Dec 23 '10 at 21:19
2  
@Kstro21: Not if there are >= 50 entries in the directory... – Georg Fritzsche Dec 23 '10 at 21:27
    
k, i updated my answer to do a bounds check, now please remove the down-vote! it burns, it burns! – Andrew Garrison Dec 23 '10 at 21:35
    
What happens when the listdir function reads only 4 directories? Whole program needs some redesign and some understanding of data structures. – Thomas Matthews Dec 23 '10 at 21:39
    
@Thomas: i believe std::string ctor will set length to 0, so it would handle that case correctly - in that it would exit the loop after the fourth element in the dirs array. – Andrew Garrison Dec 23 '10 at 21:42

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