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I'm having trouble on what pattern I should use to accomplish this

class DateTimeReference {
    function __construct($time) {
        $this = new DateTime($time, new DateTimeZone("UTC"));

    }
}

$date = new DateTime("now");                // in server time
$dateref = new DateTimeReference("now");    // in UTC

Basically I want to create an "extension" of the DateTime object but with a set timezone. Of course, this is an error because you can't re-assign $this. I don't want to make use of a factory object--can anyone recommend me on how I could approach this (or what pattern to use, with an example?). Possibly the decorator pattern?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know if this would fit the patterns you want to use but it should work.

class DateTimeReference extends DateTime {
    function __construct(string $time = "now" , DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ) {
        parent::__construct($time, new DateTimeZone("UTC"));
    }
}

or if you want the user to be able to overwrite timezone but default to UTC if not set:

class DateTimeReference extends DateTime {
    function __construct(string $time = "now" , DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ) {
        parent::__construct($time,  is_null($timezone) ?  new DateTimeZone("UTC") : $timezone );
    }
}
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Can you just do:

date_default_timezone_set('UTC');

Depends on what else your app does, but if you can do this this is the simplest :-)

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I want to use DateTime =p –  axsuul Dec 24 '10 at 0:55
    
You can. If you do this, the default timezone for the DateTime object will now be UTC, which is basically what your code is trying to achieve. –  James Dec 24 '10 at 10:24

I don't see a problem doing this..

class DateTimeReference extends DateTime {
    function __construct($time, $timezone) {
        parent::__construct($time);
        $this->setTimeZone(new DateTimeZone($timezone));
    }
}

$dateref = new DateTimeReference("now", "America/New_York");

You can also make the timezone optional via:

class DateTimeReference extends DateTime {
    function __construct($time, $timezone = "America/New_York") {
        parent::__construct($time);
        $this->setTimeZone(new DateTimeZone($timezone));
    }
}

$dateref = new DateTimeReference("now");

Also, you can simply pass a new DateTimeZone object to DateTime's constructor:

$dateref = new DateTime("now", new DateTimeZone("America/New_York"));

See the examples section: http://www.php.net/manual/en/datetime.construct.php

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This doesn't work because you're redefining the constructor. But I don't want to have to pass the DateTimeZone object everytime to the constructor, which is the point of DateTimeReference –  axsuul Dec 24 '10 at 0:55
    
In the first example, you don't pass a DateTimeZone object, you pass a string that defines the timezone you want to work with. You can set a default if you'd like to make the timezone optional. I'll edit my answer to reflect this. –  Andre Dec 24 '10 at 14:18

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